yakskullsmug.jpg
U.S. Customs and Border Protection
Stop me if you've heard this one already: So, a traveler innocently returning from Tibet is making his way through

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What's that Smell? It's a Duffel Bag Full of Stinky Yak Skulls at Sea-Tac Airport!

yakskullsmug.jpg
U.S. Customs and Border Protection
Stop me if you've heard this one already: So, a traveler innocently returning from Tibet is making his way through customs at Sea-Tac Airport when Woody, the sniffing Customs and Border Protection beagle, catches a waft of something peculiar.

The smell, as the headline suggests, was coming from four large yak skulls. As the Associated Press and 97.3 KIRO FM have reported, the skulls were discovered April 30 at Sea-Tac Airport, tucked inside the duffel bag of a traveler who apparently didn't realize bringing large animal skulls from a far-off land - two of them reportedly still covered with pieces of dried flesh - would cause such an uproar.

According to reports, the traveler discovered two of the skulls (the ones with the dried flesh still attached) while hiking in Tibet. He was apparently so taken by the funky-smelling souvenirs that he picked up two additional large yak skulls (these ones cleaned) at what's described as a village store.

He then tucked all his awesome findings into his duffel bag and headed home.

Until, that is, Woody stepped (and sniffed) in.

As a tip to future yak-skull-smuggling travelers, the AP reports that the man with the now-rank duffel bag won't be prosecuted for his unknowing offense because he declared the skulls souvenirs once Woody caught on to him.

Sadly for the traveler, however, the skulls were destroyed under high-pressure steam, with Agriculture Program Manger Luca Furnare telling the AP that this approach prevents the introduction of animal disease into the U.S.

It also, of course, prevented the introduction of a duffel bag full of stinky yak skulls into the country - which may be for the best.

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