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Nickelodeans
As Mayor Mike McGinn rolls out yet another City Hall plan to solve the homeless problem today, Nicklesville, the four-year-old homeless encampment named for

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Mayor Maps Homeless Strategy as Nickelsville Marks 1-Year Anniversary (with 2 Weddings)

niconell.jpg
Nickelodeans
As Mayor Mike McGinn rolls out yet another City Hall plan to solve the homeless problem today, Nicklesville, the four-year-old homeless encampment named for the previous mayor, will mark its first anniversary at the same West Marginal Way location this Sunday.

The noon event will include a ceremony indicative of the tent city's stability: a double wedding of two Nickelsville couples. "An encampment of our size," says spokesperson Revel Smith, "staying for one year in one place in Seattle, hasn't happened since the Great Depression."

The residents reportedly getting hitched side-by-side are Thelema Johnson and Charlie Smith, and Josh Smith and Barbie Houseman, in a ceremony to be presided over by the Christian Crusaders, a motorcycle club.

Born during the Greg Nickels mayoral reign in 2008, the homeless encampment, numbering from the dozens to the hundreds, has been forced to move 15 times, going from neighborhood to neighborhood and occasionally to the Eastside. This time last year, it just one day packed up and moved back to its original site.

As Smith recalls in a press release:

On Friday the 13th last year we set out on a secret mission - "The Black Cat Caravan." Over 20 vehicles and 120 Nickelodeons and supporters left old Fire Station #39 in Lake City, supposedly to talk to Seattle City Hall politicians. But we'd already concluded they weren't ready to help, and kept on going toward The Duwamish, back to our first site where Nickelsville started in September of 2008. Slowly but surely,things have been getting better for Nickelsville ever since.

Though homelessness isn't one of his major concerns, McGinn has said he won't seek the eviction of the self-managed eco-village, for which Nickelodeans are grateful. But, says Smith, "The struggle isn't over, by any means. The City of Seattle still will not recognize our existence, and we therefore lack either police protection or on-site utilities. We never know what the next day holds."

The Black Cat Caravan

 
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