skechers shape ups kim kardashian.jpg
Did you buy a pair of Skechers "Shape-Ups" hoping to lose some weight? Sadly, are you still fat? Well, then, there just might be a

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Justice for People Who Bought Skechers 'Shape-Ups' But Are Still Fat

skechers shape ups kim kardashian.jpg
Did you buy a pair of Skechers "Shape-Ups" hoping to lose some weight? Sadly, are you still fat? Well, then, there just might be a (partial) refund coming your way.

Attorney General Rob McKenna - also the Republican candidate in this year's governor's race - announced through his office today that Skechers has allocated up to $40 million for consumer refunds and will pay an additional $5 million to 44 states as a result of a lawsuit filed against the company alleging false advertisement. In the simplest terms, the lawsuit - which McKenna's office, the Federal Trade Commission, 43 other states and the District of Columbia got in on - contends that claims made by Skechers about the company's "Shape-Up" line of footwear stating the shoes could help people get in shape without actually working out were completely bogus.

Who knew?

Skechers decided to settle the lawsuit rather than fight it, meaning the company has not admitted any wrongdoing and still denies the allegations of false advertisement. Still, Skechers will be parting with a substantial chunk of change as a result of the court action.

Details of the settlement were provided in a snarky and somewhat ridiculous press release posted on the Attorney General's Website:

Skechers will pay $117,138 to Washington state. About half will cover the state's legal fees and the rest will be used for consumer education, for health care purposes including but not limited to health-related research or education or programs directed towards girls' or women's' physical fitness, proper nutrition or reduction of obesity.

Under the settlement, Skechers is prohibited from making health and fitness claims unless it has adequate substantiation to do so. Consumers who purchased Shape-Ups, Tone-Ups, or the Skechers Resistance Runner should go to ftc.gov for information about how to obtain a partial refund.

For those playing at home, by our math that means Washington spent about $60,000 on the lawsuit.

Perhaps best of all, the lawsuit has inspired McKenna to start delivering fitness advice.

"Advertising materials claimed that consumers may 'get in shape without setting foot in a gym' even though there's no good evidence to show the shoes work as advertised," says McKenna via press release. "Don't cancel your gym membership. File these sketchy footwear claims under 'too good to be true.'"

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