mittrrrr.jpg
Local investor
Not unexpectedly, Mitt Romney has invested some of his millions in Boeing and Microsoft stock, according to the Republican presidential candidate's 550 pages

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Mitt Romney's Tax Return: He Buys (and Sells for Profit) Stock in Boeing, Microsoft, Costco

mittrrrr.jpg
Local investor
Not unexpectedly, Mitt Romney has invested some of his millions in Boeing and Microsoft stock, according to the Republican presidential candidate's 550 pages of just-released tax returns, and made a tidy profit off the aerospace and software giants. But he's also done well buying and selling Costco stock - one of many investments that helped him become one of the richest candidates to run for the White House.

His Costco investments, included in one of several trust accounts for Romney and his family, were short term. Three separate share buys in the summer of 2009 were sold off in January 2010 for a $13,000 profit.

His trust managers invested long term in Microsoft, with buys in 2003 and 2005, selling them in 2010 for a $10,000 gain. All the Boeing stock was purchased in 2008 and sold in 2010 for a $15,000 profit.

While they might be windfalls to the average person, the investment gains were minor contributions to the $21 million that Mitt and Ann Romney earned that year (compared to Barack and Michelle Obama's $1.8 million).

The Washington Post reports that Romney earned most his income -- $21.7 million in 2010 and $20.9 million in 2011 -- from profits, dividends or interest from investments, and none from wages or salaries.

ProPublica and the New York Times also dug up these details from Romney's 2010 and "in-progress" 2011 tax returns:

-Speaking fees: Last week Romney told a crowd in South Carolina: "I get speaker's fees from time to time, but not very much." Turns out his author/speaking fees amounted to precisely $528,871 in 2010, and $110,500 in 2011.

-Like [Newt] Gingrich, Romney doesn't seem to have a home mortgage, as neither took a deduction in 2010. Obama, on the other hand, took a home mortgage interest deduction of $49,945.

As for being a one-percenter, Romney, the Times notes, ranks high within that bracket of the filthy rich: "According to the Internal Revenue Service's most recent available statistics of income, for 2009, there were 8,274 taxpayers with an adjusted gross income of $10 million or more, out of more than 140 million total returns filed. So anyone who makes more than $10 million would be in the top 0.006 percent of taxpayers."

 
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