jaywalk punch02.jpg
Not this SPD jaywalker punching, a different one.
An unidentified Seattle police officer who "excessively" punched a jaywalking suspect in the face will get off

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Seattle Police 'Clerical Mistake' Means Cop Who Punched Jaywalker Is Off the Hook

jaywalk punch02.jpg
Not this SPD jaywalker punching, a different one.
An unidentified Seattle police officer who "excessively" punched a jaywalking suspect in the face will get off scot free. To be clear: It's not this Seattle police officer who punched a jaywalker in the face, or this one, but some other cop-punching-jaywalker incident altogether.

KOMO News reports that Kathryn Olson, the director of SPD's Office of Professional Accountability has said that an unnamed officer who punched a jaywalking man, and was ruled by the OPA to have violated police code in doing so, won't be punished because the department lost his file and then found it again after the deadline for filing it.

Councilmember Tim Burgess is not amused.

Olson's office had 180 days to investigate the claims. The case was ruled excessive, but a clerical mistake sent the disciplinary notice to the wrong officer, and by the time anyone noticed the mistake the 180-day deadline had long since passed.

Now several Seattle City Council members are trying to figure out how the mistake happened.

"So on day 177 when the notice was given, the clock stopped ticking," said Councilman Tim Burgess. "It would have stopped ticking. It stopped ticking with regard to the officer who was named. It didn't stop ticking with regard to the officer who should have been named."

As we mentioned earlier, SPD officers have a rather long, proud history with punching jaywalkers.

Here's Officer Ian Walsh punching a 17-year-old teen jaywalker in the face.

And here's an unnamed officer punching a 17-year-old mentally-disabled jaywalker in the face.

To be sure, in both of the incidents above, suspects were resisting arrest. It's just that punches to the face aren't exactly standard procedure for arresting officers.

Then again, neither are "clerical errors."

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