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UPDATE: In a swift reversal, King County Metro has now decided to allow the "Buy American" ad after all. More after the jump.

UPDATE CONTINUED:

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King County Metro Bans 'Buy American' Bus Ad (UPDATE: Metro Caves, Allows Ad)

KC metro01.jpg
UPDATE: In a swift reversal, King County Metro has now decided to allow the "Buy American" ad after all. More after the jump.

UPDATE CONTINUED: In a statement to reporters Metro Transit General Manager Kevin Desmond said that after a second look, the ad wasn't as political as they had originally deemed.

"Upon further review, the text of the ad does not express an opinion about a public issue, as prohibited by our policy, but rather is a promotion of the sale of goods. Therefore, we will allow it to run."

For T.A.P., the company that had purchased the $8,000 ad, having Metro reject it was probably the best thing that could have happened. Garnering national press and general outrage, Metro's decision put T.A.P.'s ad on the home pages and TV screens of people around the nation, giving more banG for the advertising buck than could have likely ever been imagined by the small nonprofit.

The lesson in all this therefore appears to be: Getting an ad rejected by a public entity can often be better than getting accepted.

For those wondering where King County Metro would draw its line in the sand on which ads were "too political" to run, we now have a better answer. And the line is much closer to home than you might think.

Metro just banned an ad urging people to "Buy American", which was sponsored by the Seattle non profit TAP (Tolerance. Americanism. Patriotism.) for being too political.

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The reason for the banning stems from a proposed ad by the Seattle Mideast Awareness Campaign a year ago, which depicted a rubble-strewn street along with the words "Israeli War Crimes: Your Tax Dollars at Work."

The ad created such a stir that Metro vowed it would ban all ads with a political tone.

And while it could be easy to argue that "Buy American" is more of a commercial tone than a political one, Metro sees otherwise.

"The concept of 'Buy American' is an issue of both political and economic debate," Metro said in a statement.

I give this story about three hours before it's on FOX News.

 
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