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West Seattle Blog
His home aflame.
Seattle attorney John C. Siegel , who earlier worked a plea deal to charges of threatening a Seattle judge

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John Siegel, Seattle Attorney Who Represented Himself, Earns 20-Month Prison Term for Arson

fireeee.jpg
West Seattle Blog
His home aflame.
Seattle attorney John C. Siegel, who earlier worked a plea deal to charges of threatening a Seattle judge and sprung himself from jail, has now worked a plea to several cases that got him thrown back in the slammer: arson and domestic violence. But this time, acting as his own attorney, he wound up with a 20-month prison sentence.

In the latest deal, according to court records, Siegel has pled guilty in King County Superior Court to four felonies - attempting to burn down his West Seattle home and three violations of a no-contact order. In filing the amended complaint, prosecutors agreed to drop other charges in return for his plea and a 20-month term. His license to practice law is currently suspended.

Siegel was jailed on the arson in June just weeks after he'd been released for the felony harassment of Seattle Municipal Court Judge Kimi Kondo. Working out of his cell - literally, a jailhouse lawyer - Siegel had bargained the harassment and others charges down to a misdemeanor and was released after two months in stir.

The attorney was originally held on $1.5 million bail for threatening to kill Judge Kondo in March. Siegel was also accused of witness-tampering and other charges springing from a domestic-violence case in which he allegedly slugged his ex-wife and said he didn't fear Seattle's city attorney, vowing to "eat him for breakfast."

Siegel received a suspended 12-month sentence and probation for two years in the Kondo case, acting as his own attorney in that as well as the latest case. As West Seattle Blog notes:

...the list of files in the four-month-old arson case is longer than many lists from cases that have been going on for years, and full of documents he wrote by hand while in jail...

From his cell office, Siegel also filed a civil lawsuit against the Weekly for its reporting on his court run-ins. That suit was dropped in September.

The June arson did about $100,000 damage to the Gatewood neighborhood home he co-owns with his ex-wife. Police said the ex-wife had allowed Siegel to temporarily stay at the house because he was homeless. After the fire, Siegel was apparently despondent and indicated he didn't want to live, police said.

His latest plea agreement includes a requirement to undergo alcoholism and mental health counseling once he is released from prison. He is to be sentenced next month.

Siegel's Guilty Plea

 
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