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Chris Staniforth, a 20-year-old British student, dropped dead in May. His parents say what killed their son was a small piece of competitively priced gaming

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Parents to World: Xbox Killed Our Son, Can Kill Yours Too

Chris Staniforth02.jpg
Chris Staniforth, a 20-year-old British student, dropped dead in May. His parents say what killed their son was a small piece of competitively priced gaming equipment currently in the homes of millions of people worldwide . . . That and sitting on the couch for a half-day at a time.

Specifically, Staniforth died of complications from deep vein thrombosis (DVT), a condition caused by a blot clot in a vein or artery, often in the legs, which can then travel elsewhere in the body (as it did in Staniforth's case) and become a fatal pulmonary embolism.

Staniforth's father, David Staniforth, says he thinks the condition was caused by his son's Xbox habit, which would see him sitting stationary for, often, 12 hours on end while he played Halo 3.

BBC:

Mr Staniforth said: "After my research I saw there was no difference to Chris sitting at a desk on his Xbox and someone on a long-haul flight.

"Sitting still is literally the danger zone. Chris loved to play and would stay up all night.

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Chris Staniforth died of Xbox-related complications, his parents say.
Now Staniforth's parents have started a campaign aimed at alerting others to the dangers of video games and of sitting on one's ass for extended periods of time. A website detailing such information is apparently in the works.

The warning is not without merit. DVT, sometimes called "traveler's thrombosis" or "economy-class syndrome," is often associated with long flights where people don't move for hours and hours. Whether one's posterior is parked in an airline seat from Seattle to London Heathrow or on a La-Z-Boy recliner deep in a 13-hour session of Halo 3, the results can be identical.

Not that any of that will or should stop people from playing video games. The Staniforths appear to be hoping merely that they'll take a break every now and then to, you know, move something other than their thumbs.

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