knoxxx.jpg
Accidental ingenue.
It's not new detail, but there is a fresh take in the current Rolling Stone on the Amanda Knox conviction--which is on appeal

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Amanda Knox Didn't Do It: Rolling Stone Joins the Chorus as Key DNA Finding Is Announced

knoxxx.jpg
Accidental ingenue.
It's not new detail, but there is a fresh take in the current Rolling Stone on the Amanda Knox conviction--which is on appeal and during which court-appointed experts today said some of the DNA evidence used to convict her may have been contaminated, a major breakthrough hailed by her family as "great news."

Seattle's "accidental ingénue," as the magazine calls Knox, "didn't realize that she would be judged by her behavior, her looks and her nationality" as she stood trial for, and was convicted of, the murder of Meredith Kercher. Knox's catastrophic mistake was allowing the postal police, the juvenile varsity state cops, to enter her home, rather than waiting for the more professional carabinieri to arrive, RS thinks.

For starters, the carabinieri would have prevented anyone from tramping through the crime scene. The two postal-police officers, however, allowed themselves to be led through the house in search of clues by a band of child sleuths out of Scooby-Doo.

The incompetent police work led also to the mishandling of evidence. There was no physical trace of Knox in Kercher's death-scene bedroom as well. All that was followed by Italy's carnivalesque judicial process, the magazine notes, "where there is never order in the court, the lawyers and defendants constantly interrupting the proceedings with groans and catcalls and wild gesticulations, while the press in the gallery yammers away like the kids in the back of the classroom."

The prosecution failed to establish motive or intent ("We live in an age of violence with no motive," said one prosecutor), and did not drop the case against Knox and her boyfriend Raffaele Sollecito even after bloody fingerprints and footprints came back matching a 20-year-old petty thief named Rudy Guede. She was convicted and given 26 years in prison.

However, Italian news agency ANSA today reports that findings filed in a Perugia court by court-appointed forensic experts--casting new doubt on crucial DNA evidence--boost the claims of Knox and Sollecito, who had argued that the evidence had been contaminated by police during their investigation.

"We are thrilled," Knox's mother, Edda Mellas, told ABC News from Italy where she was waiting to visit her daughter in prison. "This is what our experts said all along. This is great news. We've always known Amanda is innocent."

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