born this way02.jpg
Fortunately for Amazon, that money will probably be returned in droves if it ends up boosting the company's new Cloud Player like it's supposed to.

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Amazon Lost $3.2 Million Selling Lady Gaga Album for $1

born this way02.jpg
Fortunately for Amazon, that money will probably be returned in droves if it ends up boosting the company's new Cloud Player like it's supposed to.

Bringing you up to speed, last week Amazon announced that it would sell Gaga's new album Born This Way for a cool dollar. Within hours, millions of fans flooded Amazon's site, crashing the servers and capturing headlines.

The next day, Amazon tried again, this time with servers that they said had been beefed up in anticipation of the Gaga onslaught.

Now we know the grand total of what it cost Amazon to both list the album at the steep discount (which cost the company $6 per album) and to deal with the resulting crash.

That figure: $3.2 million.

But as Gizmodo correctly points out (despite the typos), that number will likely pale in comparison to the potential windfall that could come in if Amazon's new Cloud Player becomes a hit on the back of one of pop music's most anticipated albums.

. . . loss-leader strategis (sic) aside, if you're up on Amazon's wheelings and dealings this month, you know that the Cloud Player is still very much in its infancy, Google just launched its own cloud-based music locker, and Apple is rumoed (sic) to be all but ready to launch their streaming-based iTunes service at WWDC. That's some serious competition, and what better way to increase awareness than basically give away a sure-fire hit pop album through your MP3 store?

Something suggests that album roll-outs timed with new technology debuts will soon become commonplace.

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