snail apple01.jpg
The environment. It's a complicated thing! But that's only if you care about stuff like "details" or "science." If all you really care about is

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Washington's Environment Is Apparently Known for Two Things: Apples and Snails

snail apple01.jpg
The environment. It's a complicated thing! But that's only if you care about stuff like "details" or "science." If all you really care about is boiling things down to what a state is "good at" and what it's not, then it's easy. Plus you get to make pretty maps like this one.

Actually, the folks at Mother Nature Network who came up with the maps, are usually quite good at paying attention to both science and details. But that stuff's boring and probably won't get read.

Anyhow, here's what each state apparently "excels" at.

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Now here's what they're bad at.

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Like we said: apples and snails.

The apple thing is a given. It's the stereotypical Washington produce and something we're quite proud of. The fact that so many are organic is likely just because there are so many apples, period. But either way, we'll take it.

But invasive snails? The most?

The United States Geological Survey lists 18 invasive snail species in Washington and only six species of native snails.

So, yeah, that's quite a lot of non-native snails.

Weird, though, that MNN picked out invasive snails in Washington, but left out invasive mollusks in all the Great Lakes states, where species like the zebra and quagga mussels cause about $1 billion per year in damage to hydroelectric infrastructure, boats, and marinas, not to mention causing untold damage to native aquatic species.

Still, it could be worse. We could have the fewest librarians per capita, like North Carolina (WTF?).

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