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For last night's phenomenal comeback win, which catapulted the Mariners to a 3-7 record, 13,056 fans reportedly showed up , breaking the record low of

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Trade Ichiro: Record-Low Crowds Remove the Only Reason to Keep Fan Favorite on the Mariners Roster

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For last night's phenomenal comeback win, which catapulted the Mariners to a 3-7 record, 13,056 fans reportedly showed up, breaking the record low of 14,543 set a few days earlier against the Orioles. We were there--the crowd was actually about half that. The Mariners are open about the fact that they're in rebuilding mode. So tell me again: Why is it that they don't trade Ichiro Suzuki?

We've presented the "trade Ichiro" argument roughly once per year for the last three, yet our case has never been stronger than right now. The Mariners are as bad as they were when they trotted out Rick Sweet (pictured) as catcher, which is really fucking bad. So bad that it's as though the Kingdome suddenly unimploded--save for the roof--and you could turn your $7 bleacher seat into front row on the first base line simply by walking there.

The argument for keeping the 37-year-old Suzuki in blue and white is that he's the Mariners' main draw. Yet the Mariners aren't drawing anyone with him, and they're unlikely to be competitive until he's 40. Every passing day diminishes his trade value, yet he's still spry enough that the Red Sox or Yankees would be likely to expend a ton of prospects to get him. That's another thing: The Mariners' farm system is far from stocked. (The most overlooked story of the past three years has been what a colossal bust "future closer" Josh Fields has been.) Trading Suzuki now is the one surefire way to toss more eggs in the spawning stream.

While we're on the topic of the Mariners, let's discuss the Jack Wilson situation. He was moved to second base so Brendan Ryan could start at shortstop. Ryan might be competent in the field, but he's so bad at the plate that the team ought to consider DH'ing for him instead of the pitcher at this point. In other words, there was simply no reason to ask a veteran shortstop--no slouch in the field himself--to switch positions at this point in his career. If the M's started Wilson at short and Adam Kennedy at second, they'd actually have a middle infield that could put some pine on pitches.

But look on the bright side: At least the M's are now managed by John Holmes' stunt double. That goes a long way.

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