balkan war01.jpg
It's been 18 years since the massacre at Trusina. And in those years, the Bosnian government believes Edin Dzeko has been living in Washington, the

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Edin Dzeko, Everett Resident, Arrested for Bosnian War Crimes

balkan war01.jpg
It's been 18 years since the massacre at Trusina. And in those years, the Bosnian government believes Edin Dzeko has been living in Washington, the blood of three innocent villagers still on his hands.

Dzeko, a 39-year-old man who ironically shares his name with a Bosnian soccer star universally loved by his countrymen, was arrested in Everett on Wednesday by U.S. Marshals, and may be extradited to the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina to stand trial for war crimes.

The Seattle Times reports that Dzeko is accused of being a member of a Bosnian Army strike team that, during the Balkan War in 1993, massacred Croatian civilians in the village of Trusina.

According to Human Rights Watch, the Trusina Massacre took place along with several atrocities at the height of the conflict.

On May 9, Bosnian Croat officials began evicting, arbitrarily arresting and detaining thousands of Muslim civilians in the Mostar area. In early June, Muslim forces launched an offensive against Bosnian Croat positions in central Bosnia, and thousands of Croats were forcibly displaced from their homes. After a mutiny of Muslim soldiers in the HVO in late June, Bosnian Croat forces arrested Muslim men in western Hercegovina. Those arrested in May and June were detained in camps at the Rodoc heliodrome outside Mostar and at the Dretelj and Gabela camps near Capljina, where they suffered from malnutrition and were beaten and forced to work along the front lines. Bosnian Croat forces obstructed delivery of humanitarian aid to the Muslim-controlled area of Mostar for over two months. Relief convoys were attacked by Bosnian Croat forces near Travnik.

Muslim forces summarily executed civilians and disarmed combatants in the villages of Trusina, Doljani, Miletici and Uzdol and near the town of Konjic. Bosnian government troops beat prisoners in detention and forced them to work on the front lines. Muslim forces also obstructed humanitarian aid destined for wounded Croats in the village of Nova Bila.

Dzeko is accused of having no small role in what went on at Trusina.

The Times reports that extradition documents say he forced one villager out of his home where he was shot by another soldier. He also supposedly threw another man into a yard and shot and killed him himself, and then, with that man's wife screaming in front of him, he killed her as well.

Dzeko's lawyer is claiming that have arrested the wrong man.

The good news for Dzeko is that even if they arrested the right man, and he is sent home and convicted, he likely won't face a fate nearly as heinous as what befell his alleged victims.

Consider that Serbian police chief Vlastimir Djordjevic was convicted of war crimes in the Balkans this past February and found responsible for some 700 civilian deaths.

Djordjevic got 24 years in prison.

So Dzeko, if convicted, should be out in a fraction of that time.

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