Everett Settles $15M Police Shooting Lawsuit for $500K--John T. Williams' Family Should Expect No More

Someday soon the city of Seattle, and by the city, we mean you the taxpayer, will have to fork over a large sum of money in a civil lawsuit over the unjustified shooting of John T. Williams. How much money? Who knows. But the city of Everett today settled its own civil lawsuit stemming from an arguably much more heinous police shooting, yet managed to do so at a fraction of the amount that had originally been sought.

As The Herald reports today, Everett city attorneys have settled the case for $500,000, down from what began as a $15 million suit.

In many ways the Everett case is different than Seattle's, but in other ways it's very similar.

It happened on June 10, 2009 and involved Ofc. Troy Meade, who had shown up at the Chuckwagon Inn after several calls came in reporting that 51-year-old Niles Meservey was drunk and trying to drive home.

Ofc. Troy Meade was charged with second-degree murder for shooting Niles Meservey, but was eventually acquitted.
When Ofc. Meade and his partner arrived, Meservey wouldn't get out of his car. The officers then boxed him in with their cruisers and Tased him twice in an attempt to get him to comply. Eventually Meservey tried to drive away, and ran his car into a fence.

That's when Meade reportedly said "Time to end this, enough is enough" and shot him seven times in the back though the rear window of the car.

As opposed to SPD's Ofc. Ian Birk, Meade was actually charged with second-degree murder in the shooting, though he was eventually acquitted.

Still, compared to the $15 million that the family requested, to go down to $500,000 is quite the concession.

And if that's the best that victims of a cop shooting can do when the officer was actually charged with a crime, don't be surprised if there are even fewer options for the Williams family in the Birk shooting case, where, as we now know, no charges will be filed.

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