NBA.com Columnist Begs League to Bring Hornets to Seattle

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We've been on the record numerous times saying that the chance that the New Orleans Hornets will be bought by Steve Ballmer and moved to Seattle is unlikely at best. Obviously, that doesn't mean we wouldn't love to see a new NBA team in town--'cause we would. And when a columnist for NBA's official website makes the case that he too thinks a Hornet migration to the Pacific Northwest is the best thing for the team and for the league as a whole, we're gonna go ahead and agree wholeheartedly.

Veteran sports writer Fran Blinebury writes in a piece published Wednesday:

. . . even though there are still some hard feelings about the way the Sonics were hurried off to Oklahoma City. There were few sights more electrifying and few atmospheres more intimidating than when the likes of Dennis Johnson, Jack Sikma, and Fred Brown were playing before crowds that often topped 30,000 at the Kingdome, fueling back-to-back trips to The Finals in 1978 and 1979, the latter producing the only major sports championship in the history of the city.

He also recounts the electrifying atmosphere at game four of the 1996 NBA finals, where despite being down 0-3 to Michael Jordan's Chicago Bulls, the team won the game, the confetti rained, and Jet City was as proud as any world champion-hosting city ever has been.

This was the NBA in Seattle and the way it could be, should be again. It's time to reconcile. The opportunity is at hand.

As for any new evidence that such a move is imminent, Blinebury has none. He cites the depressing attendance numbers for New Orleans that spiked for several games, but sagged again early this week. He also points out that NBA Commissioner David Stern "likes" Ballmer, and that the Big Easy has never been much of a basketball town anyway.

Stuff we've all heard before.

But still--when the league's official website publishes what amounts to a fully-lubed handjob for the Seattle sports fan, it's best to just sit back and enjoy it.

 
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