kevin_turner_microsoft_ballmer_income_tax.jpg
Steve Ballmer finished the last fiscal year, which ends in June at Microsoft, with $1.34 million in total compensation--a nearly 6 percent raise over last

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Steve Ballmer's Not the Only Microsoft Millionaire Who Doesn't Want to Pay Income Tax On His Raise

kevin_turner_microsoft_ballmer_income_tax.jpg
Steve Ballmer finished the last fiscal year, which ends in June at Microsoft, with $1.34 million in total compensation--a nearly 6 percent raise over last year, according to the Seattle Times. As has already been reported, he wants to hang onto as much of that cash as he can, donating $100,000 to stop a state income tax on the wealthy. It turns out, Ballmer is actually on the low side of the 'Soft's executive pay scale, and he's not the only one attempting to keep all that money.

Here's who else donated to the effort to defeat Bill Gates' dad's plan to tax the wealthy.

According to the state Public Disclosure Commission, Microsoft COO Kevin Turner's total compensation in the last fiscal year hit $10.4 million--almost double what he made the year before. And like Ballmer, he's not keen on giving it up to bail out the state's cash-strapped public school system. Turner contributed $10,000 toward stopping the initiative.

CFO Peter Klein took home $3.2 million in the last fiscal year. He'd also like to hang onto his cash--donating $2,500 to the cause of defeating the income tax.

The three other highest earners at Microsoft last year--Robbie Bach, Chris Uddell, and Stephen Elop--haven't contributed to either side. All three are also leaving their positions in the executive ranks, according to the Times.

Microsoft founder Bill Gates-the-younger supposedly supports the income tax. But hasn't opened his wallet to one side or the other.

 
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