aircraft carrier.jpg
Could this behemoth be the key to keeping the lights on in Haiti?
In 1929, Tacoma was suffering through a drought and looking for help

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Could an 80-Year-Old Tacoma Drought Offer Haiti a Model for Recovery?

aircraft carrier.jpg
Could this behemoth be the key to keeping the lights on in Haiti?
In 1929, Tacoma was suffering through a drought and looking for help. No rain meant no hydroelectric power. Cascade Paper Company had to cut power and lay off 300 people. Fort Lewis had to kill the lights at 4 p.m.

Tacoma petitioned President Herbert Hoover. Who eventually convinced the Secretary of the Navy to order the U.S.S. Lexington to Tacoma's Baker Dock where it was met by a brass band.

Tacoma used the Lexington's boilers like a homeowner would a generator drug out of the garage after an outage, powering a quarter of the city from December through January of the next year. Ironically enough, that same month a fresh batch of rain clouds rolled through the harbor, thus ending the need for an auxiliary outlet.

So what's this have to do with Haiti?

Thomas Ricks wonders if Tacoma's experience using an Navy ship to keep civilization humming could provide a model for the island's post-earthquake recovery. The national security blogger at Foreign Policy and former Pentagon correspondent with The Washington Post asks:

Would it be possible to use the nuclear generators aboard an American aircraft carrier or submarine to provide electricity to Port-au-Prince?
 
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