Reardon Watch: Reardon to the Rescue!

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Thomas James Hurst/Seattle Times
As you can see in this photo from the Seattle Times, Aaron Readon can flex some serious muscle.
Last weekend a carload of twenty-somethings took a 35 mph corner going 70 to 80. The car slid off the road, hit a tree, and killed two of the guys in the car. According to the Everett Herald, a third is on life support at Harborview Medical Center. The tragedy led to outcry from residents along the sidewalk-less road near the new Lynnwood High School.

The North Road, as it's known, is owned by Snohomish County. And the wreck stirred Aaron Reardon and the rest of the county government to flex some political muscle.

As you can see in the above Seattle Times photo, Reardon's got a pair of guns you should need a license to carry. He boasts biceps that would defend the heroine's honor in a paperback romance. These are the kind of arms you want to bury yourself in and hide from the cold, cruel world.

Whew.

Anyway, Reardon brought that strength to bear, with an assist from the county council, to fast-track a $15.2 million project to expand the road and add sidewalks and bike lanes, according to the Herald.

But there is one note in the story that catches the eye: "Collision studies rate the road as one of the safer ones among the 620 road segments studied countywide."

The story doesn't say anything more about the nature of those collisions, and Snohomish County Public Works Director Steve Thomsen has not yet responded to a request for more information on the relative dangerousness of the roads. But it's one of the realities of politics that squeaky wheels get grease, and what happened last weekend goes well beyond squeaking. Such tragedies instill in us a need to do something. So significant work, that will undoubtedly make North Road safer, will happen.

But, Aaron, don't forget to flex those muscles on the more dangerous roads around the county before something terrible happens.

 
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