carlsjr.jpg
In hindsight, maybe it wasn't worth the coronary.
Sad news for liberal do-gooder types who think, if they just try hard enough, the rest of

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Freakonomics Says Calorie Counts Don't Do Jack. Cheddar Jack. Cheese. Who's Hungry?

carlsjr.jpg
In hindsight, maybe it wasn't worth the coronary.
Sad news for liberal do-gooder types who think, if they just try hard enough, the rest of the world will ditch their Big Macs for arugula.

*raises hand*

From the Freakonomics blog, which highlights a NYU School of Medicine study trying to figure out if that state's law requiring restaurants to post calorie counts on their menus, similar to one that we just passed in Washington, has had any effect on eating habits.

What did they learn?

"We found that 27.7 percent [of people] who saw calorie labeling in New York said the information influenced their choices."

Great news, right? Um, no:

"However, we did not detect a change in calories purchased after the introduction of calorie labeling."

Ahhh. So what you're saying is that better information doesn't change behavior? And that just because you tell someone that the Carl's Jr. Double Six Dollar burger comes with enough calories to sustain a tribe of bushmen through the rainy season doesn't mean they'll magically have the money, nor the motivation, to buy something healthier?

Fascinating.

 
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