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While lauded for his toughness--he once tried to take infield practice wearing a colostomy bag --Adrian Beltre has proven to be not so durable, regularly

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This Is Why You Wear a Cup, Kids: Adrian Beltre Out With Torn Testicle

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While lauded for his toughness--he once tried to take infield practice wearing a colostomy bag--Adrian Beltre has proven to be not so durable, regularly missing games because of hard-luck injuries. This one, though, is his own fault. The M's have put Beltre on the disabled list for 15 games and it may turn out to be longer if he needs surgery to repair the testicular bleeding. He took a groundball to the groin in the ninth inning on Wednesday, though he stuck around for the rest of the game, scoring the winning run in the 14th.

In case you're wondering why Beltre doesn't wear a cup, apparently going relative commando is the secret to his remarkable defensive success. So reported MLB writer Jim Street last winter:

Something you probably didn't know might explain why Beltre's defense is so good. He never wears a protective cup.

"I never felt comfortable wearing a cup," the third baseman said. "I tried when I signed, but I couldn't use it. I didn't feel comfortable at all. I couldn't run, I couldn't move."

He's not alone in this insanity--NFL players aren't wearing them either. And he's not sure he's going to wear one when he gets back. "If it happens every 10 years and you get hit there, it's not bad," he says. Good God, man. These are your balls!

And now, Two Boys, One Cup: idiotic teenagers test the limits of a protective cup using golf clubs, baseball bats, and other testicle-unfriendly items:

 
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