usedcardealer.jpg
Take him for all he's worth, grandma.
No one looks too good after this story, except maybe the law enforcement who put it to an

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Not-So-Smooth Criminal Apparently Still Smoother Than Seattle-Area Car Dealers

usedcardealer.jpg
Take him for all he's worth, grandma.
No one looks too good after this story, except maybe the law enforcement who put it to an end. A dude named Muhammaed Zbeida Tillisy spent four years in federal prison for, among other things, a car-theft scam in which he posed as an official with the Libyan consulate looking to purchase the vehicle for official business. Upon being released, he allegedly returned to the exact same scam--and managed to score himself a Denali in Lynnwood, a BMW in Shoreline, and a Mercedes Benz in Seattle before he tried the exact same dealership he'd scammed his first time around (on his way to prison).

What's more stunning than his attempt to re-con the same business is that, in several of the instances, Tillisy got these car dealerships to sell him the cars after his credit card had been rejected. He did this by telling the dealer he was going to call his credit card company, instead calling a conspirator, and handing the phone over to the dealer to get the override code.

Now, I'm baffled--aren't car dealers supposed to be the slick ones? Wouldn't they want to call the credit card company themselves? And, if Tillisy's alleged business with the consulate is important to the sale--I'm not sure I understand why, but it seems it was--how does something like this happen:

Tillisy, witnesses claimed, arrived at the dealership purporting to be in need of a car for the "Libyan People's Bureau" and offered what appeared to be a signed letter from the Libyan consulate backing his claim. After researching the letter, staff at the dealership agreed to sell the $69,671 vehicle once Tillisy deposited the funds into the dealership account.

What sort of research would you do for this letter to pass muster? If you were skeptical of its provenance and looking to enter into a $70,000 transaction, wouldn't you try to independently verify that this guy is indeed a Libyan official?

I know times are tough, but you guys are car dealers. You have a reputation to uphold.

 
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