electoralcollege.jpg
The Electoral College is a nasty little civic subsidy to rural states. For example, Wyoming voters' ballots pack three times as much electoral punch as

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National Popular Vote Bill Goes to Bermuda Triangle for National Popular Vote Bills

electoralcollege.jpg
The Electoral College is a nasty little civic subsidy to rural states. For example, Wyoming voters' ballots pack three times as much electoral punch as those of Seattleites.* Thus, a number of states are looking to make the college obselete.

To remove the college altogether would require a constitutional amendment and ridiculous supermajorities; instead, state legislators propose bills that would award their state's electoral votes to the national popular vote winner--as soon as enough states (i.e. a group whose electoral votes make for a national majority) agree to do the same. Four states (Illinois, Maryland, New Jersey, and Hawaii) representing 61 electoral votes have the law on the books already.

Washington legislators have been trying this for several years, but the bills have never made it out of the rules committees, which is where bills go after they pass out of their original committee. Yesterday, Rep. Roger Goodman's (D., Kirkland) House Bill 1598 ("Approving the entry of Washington into the agreement among the states to elect the president by national popular vote") passed out of the House Committee on State Government and Tribal Affairs. On to the Rules Committe, bold bill. May you succeed where your predecessors failed!

* (Wyoming population=530,000=3 electoral votes; Seattle population=600,000=1/11 of Washington's 6.6 million. WA gets 11 electoral votes, therefore Seattle gets one.)

 
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