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I've written before about the inane bloviating that often passes for visual arts "discourse." Take something simple and pleasurable; talk it up like you're Derrida.

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Why Can't Dancers Meet Painters in the Middle?

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I've written before about the inane bloviating that often passes for visual arts "discourse." Take something simple and pleasurable; talk it up like you're Derrida. That seems to be the m.o.

Why does the dance world seem to have the opposite problem?

They take this super virtuosic form of expression and then describe it like we're all in preschool. "It's a dancey dance!"

This latest promotional video from the Seattle Dance Project is an especially nap-inducing example. The group, who've got their second show up this weekend at ACT, are a bunch of highly sophisticated PNB veterans and others. But you'll watch in vain for any enlightening discussion of their techniques, choices, or ideas.

Instead, over a glitchy, evocative soundtrack, rapidly intercut with atmospheric shots of rehearsals and a snowy Seattle cityscape, Artistic Director Julie Tobiason (in photo above) offers these insights into the newest performance as compared to their first one last January:

It's going to be another repertory piece, much like Project 1. The dance that we have decided to showcase will be very eclectic. There will be elements that people will relate to in all four pieces. They will have similarities but they also really have their individual stamp. What's exciting about the pieces is again we have that blend of local artists from the Seattle dance community and international work coming in, and really work that has not been seen here, in this area, in dance.

And here's the inspiring description of choreographer Edwaard Liang, and how he was brought in to the show:

We had seen Edwaard Liang's work at the Pacific Northwest Ballet, we know him, or people in the group know him, and really love his work so there was a consensus there to dance his work. And it worked out. Which is fabulous.

And it just goes on like that. I realize dancers aren't paid for their eloquence, but still, it seems odd that dancers and choreographers often do such a sad job of conveying what they're all about.

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