exhaust.jpg

The Christian Science Monitor has a story today about whether the recession will prevent the "Green revolution," i.e. the re-making of the world economy along

"/>

What's in a Green New Deal?

exhaust.jpg

The Christian Science Monitor has a story today about whether the recession will prevent the "Green revolution," i.e. the re-making of the world economy along more environmentally sustainable lines. Many worry that the need for economic stimulus and "shovel ready" projects, as well as the structure of state constitutions,  may derail the "green" part of Obama's "Green New Deal", funneling money instead towards building roads. (Eliot Spitzer wrote an interesting piece on how we need to look to "transformative" investments.)

Of course, bridge collapses are not cool and there's a genuine need for investment in traditional infrastructure. But lest we be too narrow in our thinking, Seattle think tank Sightline has been running a series called "Economic Turnaround," focusing on the types of solutions --particularly local ones--that might be found in a green new deal. Yesterday's entry on capturing the hot exhaust emitted by natural gas-fired boilers is a good example. Also worth reading is the entry on Van Jones, a proponent of green collar jobs training--i.e. training unskilled workers in the retrofitting that will be required to meet energy efficiency goals. There's already a shortage of such labor. (See also the two entries on "Financing Retrofits for All".) It's not sexy, but environmental and economic solutions can't always be shiny trains and plug-in cars.

 
comments powered by Disqus

Friends to Follow