In mid-September, the story about Gov. Sarah Palin’s Yahoo account being hacked had political junkies scratching at their arms for several days.

The McCain campaign

"/>

Yahoo Indicted for Hacking Palin's Yahoo

In mid-September, the story about Gov. Sarah Palin’s Yahoo account being hacked had political junkies scratching at their arms for several days.

The McCain campaign was naturally mortified that Palin’s privacy was crassly invaded. Screenshots of Vice Presidential candidate’s personal e-mails were posted on the Internet.

Even though Palin’s Yahoo account contained nothing more than shared family photos and gossip, true believers in the liberal blogosphere latched onto the story as evidence – yes evidence – that the Alaska governor was trying to subvert the Open Records Act. The fact that there were no incriminating communiqué was just further proof of her devious, Rovian machinations.

After two or three days, like most issues covered by news-makers with the attention span of a geoduck, the resolution of the Palin/Yahoo story was ignored.

For example, today the U.S. Department of Justice announced that a federal grand jury has indicted David C. Kernell, 20, a college student and son of a Democratic state legislator from Tennessee.

According to a press release sent out by the USDOJ:

The single count indictment, returned on Oct. 7, 2008, and unsealed today, alleges that on approximately Sept. 16, 2008, Kernell, a resident of Knoxville, obtained unauthorized access to Gov. Palin’s personal e-mail account by allegedly resetting the account password. According to the indictment, after answering a series of security questions that allowed him to reset the password and gain access to the e-mail account, Kernell allegedly read the contents of the account and made screenshots of the e-mail directory, e-mail content and other personal information. According to the indictment, Kernell posted screenshots of the e-mails and other personal information to a public Web site. Kernell also allegedly posted the new e-mail account password that he had created, thus providing access to the account by others.

If convicted of the charge, the defendant faces a maximum of five years in prison, a $250,000 fine and a three year term of supervised release. A trial date has not been set.

An indictment is merely an allegation. Defendants are presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty in a court of law.

A full copy of the three page indictment can be seen here.

Note to Mr. Kernell. Just remember the lesson we’ve all learned from the movie “Office Space”. Minimum security prison is no picnic. The trick is to kick someone’s ass on the first day. Or become someone’s bitch. Then everything will be all right.

 
comments powered by Disqus

Friends to Follow