obamabidensitepics.jpg

Was it good for you, too?

David Stoesz (and Pat Robertson?!) need a cigarette after a passionate night of Obama speechifying.

So does Twitter-pated Sims.

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The Afternoon After Edition

obamabidensitepics.jpg

Was it good for you, too?

David Stoesz (and Pat Robertson?!) need a cigarette after a passionate night of Obama speechifying.

So does Twitter-pated Sims.

McCain (remember that guy?) selects a mate...

...from the University of Idaho! Turns out she wasn't the only Vandal alum under consideration for the nod.

And apparently, Demfest isn't the only thing that's been happening. Stuff occurred in the areas of: coffee, fortune-telling, Bumbershoot, and Storm fashion.

And for your personal edification, the US Department of Labor explains why (most of) you get Monday off.

The first Labor Day holiday was celebrated on Tuesday, September 5, 1882, in New York City, in accordance with the plans of the Central Labor Union. The Central Labor Union held its second Labor Day holiday just a year later, on September 5, 1883.

In 1884 the first Monday in September was selected as the holiday, as originally proposed, and the Central Labor Union urged similar organizations in other cities to follow the example of New York and celebrate a "workingmen's holiday" on that date. The idea spread with the growth of labor organizations, and in 1885 Labor Day was celebrated in many industrial centers of the country.

Through the years the nation gave increasing emphasis to Labor Day. The first governmental recognition came through municipal ordinances passed during 1885 and 1886. From them developed the movement to secure state legislation. The first state bill was introduced into the New York legislature, but the first to become law was passed by Oregon on February 21, 1887. During the year four more states — Colorado, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York — created the Labor Day holiday by legislative enactment. By the end of the decade Connecticut, Nebraska, and Pennsylvania had followed suit. By 1894, 23 other states had adopted the holiday in honor of workers, and on June 28 of that year, Congress passed an act making the first Monday in September of each year a legal holiday in the District of Columbia and the territories.

 
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