Museums, Bass Guitars, Punk Rock & Beer

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flipperwestbank.jpg

Flipper West Bank

Here's an mp3 of Flipper performing "Ha, Ha, Ha," at The Funhouse last summer. 2007 Reppilf Music.

This Friday evening, I will

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Museums, Bass Guitars, Punk Rock & Beer

  • Museums, Bass Guitars, Punk Rock & Beer

  • ">

    flipperwestbank.jpg

    Flipper West Bank

    Here's an mp3 of Flipper performing "Ha, Ha, Ha," at The Funhouse last summer. 2007 Reppilf Music.

    This Friday evening, I will be bestowed a double honor. I have been invited to participate in an Oral History Live at the Experience Music Project. Experience Music Project|Science Fiction Music (EMP|SFM) has created an archive of interviews with the musicians, authors, filmmakers, producers and other key figures who have shaped American popular music and science fiction.

    Jacob McMurray, the Senior Curator of of EMP / SFM will be asking about my participation in the music world. We’ll also touch on the intersection of Grunge and state politics.

    After the Oral History program, we’ll cross the street and head over to the Funhouse for the Flipper show. If you don’t know, I play bass in Flipper now. It’s great to be out on bass again and with a band that really had an influence on me. Flipper played the Funhouse last summer and it felt like an honest-to-god punk rock show: down to the beer-soaked floor and audience standing just mere inches away!

    Flipper has been recording a new album with Jack Endino. All I can really say is that we’re making a Flipper record. Ted Falconi is doing his guitar thing, Stephen Depace has got that backbeat down and Bruce Loose is on vocals. I’m on the bass: a culmination of years of studying the Flipper dynamic through the listening experience of Generic and Gone Fishin’ records.

    I have been soaking in music my whole life. As a child, I would listen to a 4-track tape player my father had set up in our garage. We listened to Chuck Berry, Dick Dale and other straight-ahead rock music. I got hooked on AM hit radio listening to Elton John, the Sweet, and others. As I reached my teens, I made the jump to FM radio. My listening format evolution led to me to 8-track tapes, then LP’s. I got into Black Sabbath, Aerosmith, and Led Zeppelin.

    Punk Rock and American Hardcore were another step on the musical journey. It was in 1983 that I first heard Flipper. (I want to thank Buzz Osborne, who lent me his Flipper record.) Discovering the music, the sound was not only heavy and dissonant, there was a revelation that made a statement: the underground, Punk scene or whatever you want to call the movement, could make great music. While the work stands with the conventional giants of Rock, Punk left the status quo behind by creating its own structures of distribution and promotion. This resulted in a subculture of mutual interest in music that was different or even weird.

    Bruce, Ted, Stephen and the late Will Shatter made some great music. I’m happy to be part of Flipper and try to do the band justice with my bass work. Things will have come full circle with the EMP and Flipper events this Friday. Punk Rock led me to the opportunity to work with Kurt Cobain, Dave Grohl and others.

    I am very thankful to so many. Thank you EMP for inviting me to do the Oral History. Thank you to the people who listen to the music. And thanks for coming to this web column.

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