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Microsoft, sometimes leaning towards Republican candidates in the past (see: Anti-trust Years), is “Strongly Democratic" in the 2008 election cycle, based on its political contributions

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Microsoft's Democratic $

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Microsoft, sometimes leaning towards Republican candidates in the past (see: Anti-trust Years), is “Strongly Democratic" in the 2008 election cycle, based on its political contributions to date. Similar to the wind-blown strategies of other corporations, the Microsofties -- corporate and individual givers -- have gone hard to port, contributing 70 percent of their $990,494 in campaign money to the Dems, according to a list of corporate donors released today by D.C. watchdog, the Center for Responsive Politics.

Boeing, too, has eased left, slighty, in its donations, with 57 percent of its $745,152 going to Democrats (while the Machinists and Aerospace Workers union gave, as it traditionally does, almost all its donations to Dems, more than $1 million).

The center also reports on the close ties between Wall Street and Washington, with employees and political action committees of financial firms, who may be struggling, nonetheless giving $71.5 million in this election cycle -- 60 percent to Democrats:

The list of the 20 top donors this cycle is a “who's who" of the investment industry, including Goldman Sachs, Citigroup, JPMorgan Chase (which bought Bear Stearns over the weekend to save the firm from bankruptcy), Morgan Stanley, UBS AG, Lehman Brothers, the American Bankers Association and Credit Suisse…. Commercial banks have contributed a total of $17.1 million to federal politics for this election, split evenly between the two major parties.

Hillary Clinton is the favorite of securities and investment companies at $6.3 million, with Barack Obama a close second, $6 million (John McCain: $2.6 million). At $1.2 million, Clinton’s also the fav of commercial banks (Obama: $1.17, McCain: $730,000).

 
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