chris martin.jpg

CleanScapes' Chris Martin 

The anti-garbage garbage company, CleanScapes, looks likely to win its first municipal garbage collection contract. Shoreline's Public Works department announced today that

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Big Win For Garbage Man

Chris Martin's CleanScapes looks likely to get its first municipal contract.

chris martin.jpg

CleanScapes' Chris Martin 

The anti-garbage garbage company, CleanScapes, looks likely to win its first municipal garbage collection contract. Shoreline's Public Works department announced today that it is recommending that the scrappy, greener-than-thou trash hauling and street cleaning company handle the city's garbage collection starting March 1. The $5-million-per-year contract, subject to city council approval, would encompass garbage, recycling and yard waste collection for both residential and commercial sectors over a seven-year period. Up until now, Georgetown-based CleanScapes has collected garbage only for individual property owners and business districts--not an entire city. (Read last month's cover story about  the company.)

In vying for the contract, CleanScapes went up against the two largest waste hauling companies in the country: Waste Management and Allied Waste. CleanScapes is competing with those very same behemoths in Seattle, where it hopes to win one of several garbage collection contracts with the city. (Seattle Public Utilities is due to announce its recommendation on October 23rd .) In choosing CleanScapes, Shoreline said that the company's leadership "is not tied to the out-of-area corporate systems used by their two competitors" and that "they have given a lot of thought to changing the way solid waste collection occurs." It probably also didn't hurt that CleanScapes was the low bidder. "We bid aggressively to get into our first contract," says CleanScapes president Chris Martin, who declares himself "very, very pleased."

 

 
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