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So Seattle Public Utilities doesn't log recycling stats by neighborhood, but they do track it north and south of the Ship Canal Bridge. Who recycles

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Seattle: North vs. South

Who recycles more?

recycling.jpg

So Seattle Public Utilities doesn't log recycling stats by neighborhood, but they do track it north and south of the Ship Canal Bridge. Who recycles more? In total: the Southsiders-- about 1,000 tons more from January to March of this year, according to SPU's figures.

And the south cleaned up on the north in 2006, recycling a total of 34,253 tons compared to the north's 31,119 tons. Also, the south's total tonnage was up 3.5 percent last year over 2005, while the north's efforts only improved 0.4 percent.

But don't go handing out bragging rights yet. When you measure by household the north end comes out on top with an average of 73.2 pounds per home per month in 2006, compared to 71.8 pph in the south. 

Standby to see if these numbers go up as the city's zero waste strategy kicks in over the coming years. (65,000+ tons of annual recycling may sound impressive, but keep in mind that the city sent about 440,000 tons of trash to our Oregon landfill last year.)

The zero waste effort, spearheaded by Council member Richard Conlin, promises to provide (among other things) a program by 2009 that will include food waste pickup for composting at single family residences and more options for recycling construction and demolition waste.

Back to last year's numbers: both the north and south recycle about the same (by percentage) of metal and aluminum. The north recycles more glass. The north also recycles more newspaper, the south more mixed paper. The south turns in more contaminants, less tin, and less plastic.

 
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