The new Elvis exhibit at the Richard Nixon Library & Birthplace in Yorba Linda, Calif., opened last week drawing, among others, the man who made it

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Dick, Elvis and Bud

Seattle attorney unveils the Nixon Library exhibit.

The new Elvis exhibit at the Richard Nixon Library & Birthplace in Yorba Linda, Calif., opened last week drawing, among others, the man who made it all possible, Egil (Bud) Krogh Jr. Both Seattle dailies ran the same AP story on the event, apparently not realizing Krogh is 1) a Seattle attorney, 2) the former White House aide appointed by another former Seattle attorney, the late John Ehrlichman, 3) the onetime head of the Nixon Special Investigations Unit (the White House Plumbers, who sought to plug leaks to the press) and 4) the person who gave the nod to G. Gordon Liddy and E. Howard Hunt to burglarize the Beverly Hills offices of Lewis Fielding, psychiatrist to Pentagon Papers leaker Daniel Ellsberg. Krogh and the Plumbers, along with Ehrlichman, all went to prison, of couse, as Nixon's presidency collapsed under the collective weight of Watergate. Ehrlichman later wrote  that, because of the Plumbers' bungled operations, "it has to be said [Krogh] materially contributed to the demise of the Nixon administration." That's one on the plus side. Krogh also paid his societal debt, apologized for his actions, and became - a rare occurrence - an ex-felon who was allowed to reclaim his Washington state bar license. Last Monday at the library, on what would have been Elvis' 72nd birthday, attorney and author Krogh talked about the memorable meeting twix Dick and Elvis on Dec. 21, 1970, telling the audience: "The king of rock and the president of the United States shaking hands in the Oval Office doesn't compute for a lot of people." Elvis asked to be appointed a federal agent to fight commies and, yes, drug abuse in ‘Merica, and a nervous Nixon indeed crowed the king with an honorary narc's badge (in return, Elvis gave Tricky Dick a spare .45). When I last visited the Nixon library, the exhibits included a note to Nixon from Krogh's son, wishing Nixon well when he was ailing in 1994 (he died shortly thereafter), and mentioning his dad had just published a book about Elvis' drop-in. The book wasn't exactly a best seller. But, to this day, a photo of the Krogh-arranged Presley-Nixon handshake  remains the National Archives' single most-requested document. And as if to say neither of them has left the building, Nixon's library peddles Elvis momentoes at a souvenier stand along with RN signature golf balls. 

 
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