Legalized-pot crusader John Gettman's latest study on farm-grown and home-grown marijuana finds it's now America's No. 1 crop, and in Washington state, second only to

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The Green Delicious

The Prince of Pot effect on state marijuana grows.

Legalized-pot crusader John Gettman's latest study on farm-grown and home-grown marijuana finds it's now America's No. 1 crop, and in Washington state, second only to apples. The figures are projections and at variance with government studies: Federal and local law-enforcement officers, for example, last year seized 135,000 marijuana plants in the state, worth $270 million, according to the Washington State Patrol. The patrol belives dope ranks as Washington's eighth-largest crop, just ahead of sweet cherries. The abundance of B.C. Bud flowing across the border (on roadways, upon lakes, in the air and beneath the ground) from an estimated 20,000 grow operations in B.C. alone has held down the growth of farm pot in the arid right side of the state, officials presumed. But there are many unknowns (starting with the fact that grows are secret), including the Prince of Pot effect: Perhaps hundreds if not thousands of new grow operations could have sprung up in the state from seeds provided by Marc Emery, the prolific Vancouver dope-seed seller who will be in court next spring fighting extradition to Seattle, where he's charged as a drug dealer. How many of his 550 variety of pot seeds has the pot prince sown in Washington? Emery isn't sure, although he figures 70,000 of his customers are Americans. The government apparently believes he's been successful. As Seattle's (now departing) U.S. Attorney John McKay told 60 Minutes earlier this year: "Today, to our knowledge, Marc Emery is the biggest purveyor of marijuana from Canada into the United States." John  Gettman's newest study indicates Emery's indictment apparently hasn't slowed the purveying.

 
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