In part, City Hall's solution to Seattle's gridlock is to eliminate more parking - theoretically making life more miserable for car users in an attempt

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No Parking, Ever

Seeking a greener Seattle, ka-ching!

In part, City Hall's solution to Seattle's gridlock is to eliminate more parking - theoretically making life more miserable for car users in an attempt to herd them onto transit buses. Another step in that direction comes Monday when the City Council votes on a plan to eliminate what member Peter Steinbrueck describes as outdated parking requirements in neighborhoods. Research, he says, shows there is more parking (much of it free) than is actually needed by residents and shoppers. "This drives up the cost of doing business [and] providing housing, and promotes dependency on the automobile," he notes in a press release today. What seems left out of the discussion is the ongoing program to already eliminate a lot of existing free street parking. City Hall is converting 2,000 free or time-limited spaces (30-minute and two-hour spots, for example) to paid kiosk spaces, as SW reported earlier this year. Officials are also working to extend paid-parking hours to nights and weekends in some areas. It's an outgrowth of the changeover from parking meters to kiosk payment stations citywide, and an attempt to bring in ever more revenue. The wireless, solar-powered kiosks will collect $16 million in coin and credit-or-debit-card revenue this year, a $6 million jump since 2003. The stated goal of the Monday measure is a greener Seattle. Are they referring to greenbelts or greenbacks?

 
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