It's interesting to see state Superintendent of Public Instruction Terry Bergeson admit to The Seattle Times that she needs help given this year's tremendously high failure

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Schools Supe Admits Problem

WASL scores didn't soar, as predicted.

It's interesting to see state Superintendent of Public Instruction Terry Bergeson admit to The Seattle Times that she needs help given this year's tremendously high failure rate on the WASL. In fact, it's interesting—and welcome—to see Bergeson admit that there's a problem. Until now, Bergeson and other WASL boosters have insisted that students had been performing poorly in large part because the high-stakes test hadn't counted yet as a high-school graduation requirement. Students weren't taking the test seriously, they said, and once they did so, results would soar. Well, they didn't. Roughly half of last year's sophomores—who must pass the test or an equivalent assessment in order to graduate—failed to pass all three sections of the WASL as required. (See results here.) Let's hope Bergeson really will rethink the WASL, not just how to make kids perform better, but whether one do-or-die test—that may or may not be raising standards (see prior story)—is really the way we want to go.

 
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