Nothing against the VFW or American Legion . But leadership of the National Gulf War Resource Center thinks a more contemporary approach is needed to

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Veterans of Modern Wars

The VMW wants to be the soldier's voice.

Nothing against the VFW or American Legion. But leadership of the National Gulf War Resource Center thinks a more contemporary approach is needed to serve today's veterans. Hence, the birth last week of VMW—Veterans of Modern Warfare, headed up by President Julie Mock of Seattle.

"We felt it was time to create a voice of, by, and for veterans of the current wartime era, which began in 1990," says Mock, a disabled veteran of the 1991 Gulf War and a resource center leader. Any veteran or active-duty member with one or more days of active duty after Aug. 2, 1990, can join the service group. "We needed a direct voice for veterans of the current generation," says VMW Vice President Cheyne Worley, including those suffering wounds most common to Iraq—limb loss and brain trauma. A recent Fort Lewis study found one third of troops in Iraq suffer from migraine headaches; another study revealed a soaring rate of troop suicide there—at least 15 in recent months. Eighty-eight killed themselves in 2005, says the resource center.

U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., recently if belatedly pitched a helping hand on another front by introducing an amendment to study veteran health effects from depleted uranium used in Iraq. It's a companion measure to a House amendment submitted by a fellow state Democrat , U.S. Rep. Rep. Jim McDermott of Seattle.

 
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