Short Run’s Dash Grant is Now Open—Apply, and Join Their New Mini-Comics Club While You’re At It

Get $250 to develop your own comic, or pay $120 to get local comics delivered to your door.

We’ve said it before, but if it weren’t for the Short Run Comix & Arts Festival showing us how much indie talent there is in Seattle, the Seattle Weekly probably wouldn’t have a comix section. Over the course of six years, the scrappy annual expo has grown from the Vera Project to Washington Hall to the 1,000 capacity Fisher Pavillion, showcasing not only locals, but artists of international acclaim as well.

The 7th annual Short Run isn’t until November 4, but if you’re a local comix hopeful trying to crank something out in time for the show, consider applying for the Short Run Dash Grant. Last year’s grant went to Brendan Kiefer, who turned in a mini-comic about his very out-there landlord, a man who claimed he “served as Janis Joplin’s bodyguard, went on a date with Farrah Fawcett, and was Hunter S. Thompson’s Austin drug connection and barroom brawling partner.” If you’re the lucky winner this year, you will:

– Receive a $250 grant to produce your work to premiere at Short Run 2017.

– Receive access to, and instruction by, local screenprint shop Fogland Studios.

– Receive mentorship from comic artist and graphic novelist Tom Hart (“Rosalie Lightening”), and founder of The Sequential Artist’s Workshop (SAW) via email/phone/Skype.

– Have your artwork featured in Short Run’s annual group art show at Fantagraphics Bookstore and Gallery.

– Receive a free half table at the festival.

You’ve got until April 22 to turn in your application, so get going!

If you’re not a comic artist but dig reading comics, consider supporting Short Run through their new Mini-Comics Club. For $120, 10 subscribers will get a tote bag and one new mini-comic a month from artists like Marie Hausauer, James the Stanton, Fran López, Megan Kelso, Gillian Rhodes, Scott Travis, Amy Camber, E.T. Russian, Michael Heck, Taylor Dow (many of whom you may have seen in Seattle Weekly’s pages as well). For those who haven’t delved into the riches of the local scene, this club is a great way to familiarize yourself very quickly with its riches.

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