La Luz returns to its old stomping grounds for two nights of surf rock bliss. Photo by Chona Kasinger

La Luz returns to its old stomping grounds for two nights of surf rock bliss. Photo by Chona Kasinger

Pick List: Paul Simon, Lady Windermere’s Fan, La Luz

Stay entertained with our picks for the week’s best events.

STAGE

Seattle composer Nat Evans’ “storytelling-style performance work,” Flyover Country, “uses [his] family history from 1710–1940 as a lens to look at ecological destruction, genocide of indigenous people, capitalism, and food systems in the United States”—in short, all the things Laura Ingalls Wilder neglected to mention. It’s built out of “archival family images, images from site visits, drawings, dreams, music, and spoken text.” The Grocery Studios, thegrocerystudios.com. $5–$20. 8 p.m. Sat., May 19–Sun., May 20.

Lady Windermere’s Fan, from 1891, was Oscar Wilde’s first comedy—combining marital and maternal secrets, delayed revelations, and fragrantly arch one-liners according to a recipe he later perfected in An Ideal Husband, then sent up in The Importance of Being Earnest. Taproot Theatre, taproottheatre.org. $27–$50. Opens May 16. 7:30 p.m. Wed. & Thurs., 8 p.m. Fri., 2 & 8 p.m. Sat. Ends June 23.

DANCE

In What’s Missing?, collaborating choreographers Donald Byrd and Beth Corning explore subjectivity, truth, and alternate facts; one critic called it “the most clear-eyed, and most despairing, artistic response to [the 2016] election that I’ve seen to date.” Spectrum Dance Theater, spectrumdance.org. $20. 8 p.m. Thurs., May 17–Sat., May 19.

CLASSICAL, ETC.

The Synchronized Rotations of Sounds in Spaces is a piece—and an installation, kind of—for live musicians and Sonic Lighthouses, devices invented by Jimmy Johnson which “spin a highly focused beam of sound around a horizontal plane. The experience of sound emitted from this device depends entirely on the space you are in, the speed of rotation, and the type of sound input.” Sound sources include music by Billie Holiday, Maryanne Amacher, and Bette Midler. Chapel Performance Space, Good Shepherd Center, waywardmusic.com. $5–$15. 8 p.m. Sat., May 19.

MUSIC

“A little unsettling, a touch exhilarating, and something of a relief” is how Paul Simon described his decision to end regular concert touring—an announcement that when he tweeted in on February 5 must have crushed the fans he’s gathered over half a century. (He did leave the door open for “the occasional performance” for charity.) Seattle’s the second stop on the tour slated to end July 15 in London. KeyArena, Seattle Center, keyarena.com. $46–$170. 8 p.m. Fri., May 18.

The surf-rock queens of La Luz may have packed up and moved to sunnier California pastures, but the Hardly Art quartet still has Seattle in its heart. The group’s new album, Floating Features, takes things in a dreamy, hi-fi direction, displaying the confidence to drift away from Shana Cleveland’s breakneck surf-guitar riffs and ease into slow, swaying numbers that hang like sweet, fragrant clouds of smoke. Check out the new tunes when La Luz returns to its old stomping grounds for two shows: The Crocodile for the older set and The Vera Project for the all-ages crowd. The Crocodile & Vera Project, thecrocodile.com & theveraproject.org, $20. Thurs. 8 p.m. May 17 & Fri., May 18.

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