Courtesy Penguin Random House

Awkward Teen Poetry as a Force for Good

Lily Myers’ YA novel ‘This Impossible Light’ examines one young woman’s eating disorder through verse.

We’ve all got those notebook pages crammed full of bad poetry skulking somewhere around in our pasts, don’t we? I know I tried to communicate the wretched angst and hormonal discomfort of my teen years in poetry. I filled page after page of three-hole-punched notebook paper with awful, unrhymed poems in a desperate attempt to communicate the hell of my perfectly safe and privileged adolescence to the world. Thankfully, I destroyed all those papers many years ago, but sometimes I can still summon a line to mind, and it invariably makes me cringe.

The ubiquity of those bad poems—the fact that everyone, including those who’d never picked up a book of poetry in their lives, writes poetry in their youth—leads me to conclude that bad poetry must serve some higher biological function. Maybe there’s something to the teenage years that can be communicated only through poetry. Perhaps those skinny columns bedecked with too many adjectives and heavy from way too much emotion are the best way to share the intensity of adolescence. Maybe complete sentences and rigorous formatting aren’t the right tool for the job.

Ravenna author Lily Myers understands that poetry is the right medium for talking about teenage years. Her new young-adult novel, This Impossible Light, is written entirely in verse. And it’s not even one book-length narrative; it’s broken up into a series of small poems, many just one page each. The atmosphere is like stumbling across some teenager’s secret journal, the hidden volume where she keeps all her dankest poetry, then reading it from front to back. The narrative, plain and clear, reads more like a diary than a collection of poetry.

Read the rest of this review in Seattle Weekly’s print edition or online here at Seattle Review of Books. Paul Constant is co-founder of The Seattle Review of Books. Read books coverage at seattlereviewofbooks.com.

More in Arts & Culture

Brandi Carlile Notches Six Grammy Nominations

Fellow Seattleites Alice in Chains, the late Chris Cornell, and the Seattle Symphony also are up for awards.

Rachel Weisz and Emma Stone battle for the queen’s attention in <em>The Favourite</em>. Photo by Atsushi Nishijima/Twentieth Century Fox
Black Comedy with a Regal Veneer

Emma Stone and Rachel Weisz bring catty rivalry to the queen’s court in ‘The Favourite.’

Yalitza Aparicio (left) makes her feature debut as Cleo, the central character in <em>Roma</em>. Photo by Carlos Somonte
‘Roma’ Makes an Epic Film Out of an Intimate Story

Alfonso Cuarón’s memories and vision guide the Spanish-language Oscar front-runner about a young housekeeper in 1970s Mexico.

Book-It Rep’s ‘My Ántonia.’ Photo by John Ulman
In ‘My Antonia,’ Extraordinary Acting Packs a Punch

Book-It Rep’s diverse casting adds new depth to Willa Cather’s tale of friendship and hardship on the Great Plains.

Sister act: Hana Lass (Elizabeth), Kelly Karcher (Lydia), Melanie Hampton (Jane), and Shanna Allman (Mary) in ‘Miss Bennet.’ Photo by Erik Stuhaug
Taproot’s Jane Austen Sequel Hails Mary

A character whose first draft got short shrift finally finds happiness in ‘Miss Bennet: Christmas at Pemberley.’

‘In the Heights’ captures a big city neighborhood buzz at Seattle Rep. Photo by Michael Brosilow
Hitting the ‘Heights’

Seattle Rep’s production of ‘In the Heights,’ Lin-Manuel Miranda’s pre-‘Hamilton’ musical, is an energetic romp.

The Short Circuit Pacific Rim Film Festival tour stops at Northwest Film Forum with ‘Mental’ and more. Photo courtesy Short Circuit Pacific Rim Film Festival
Pick List: ‘My Àntonia,’ Sun Breaks, Bob Woodward

The week’s best entertainment offerings.

<em>‘Land of the Sweets: The Burlesque Nutcracker’</em> is returns to the Triple Door for its 13th edition. Photo by Angela Sterling
Seattle Holiday Arts Traditions Power Rankings

Which annual events deliver the most joy to the world?

Taron Egerton (Robin) and Jamie Foxx (John) take another crack at the classic in Robin Hood. Photo by Larry Horricks
The Arrows Miss Their Mark in ‘Robin Hood’

The legend’s latest rendition can’t overcome its modern smirky tone and bland lead actor.

Mahershala Ali and Viggo Mortensen form the odd couple that carries Green Book. 
Courtesy Universal Pictures
Stellar Acting Makes ‘Green Book’ A Smooth Ride

Despite its cornball touches, Mahershala Ali and Viggo Mortensen shine as a 1960s jazz pianist and his hired muscle.

If you can spread half as much spirit as the Menashe house in West Seattle (5605 Beach Dr. SW), it should be a winning holiday season. Photo by Joe Wolf/Flickr
Seattle Holiday Events Calendar 2018

Make the most of the season with 100+ regional festivals, concerts, stage shows, and more.