A Musical Murder Mystery, a Gold Star Father, and a Charlie Brown Christmas

The week’s best arts and entertainment.


Montrose Trio The best of Haydn’s many piano trios are among his greatest works, but his peculiar approach to scoring—the cellist does very little other than double whatever the pianist’s left hand is playing—make them not all that popular among ensembles. Cellist Clive Greensmith is being a good sport this time, though. He, violinist Martin Beaver, and pianist Jon Kimura Parker are also playing Shostakovich’s intense and elegiac Trio from 1944 and one by Brahms. Meany Center, UW campus, meanycenter.org. $44–$52. 7:30 p.m. Sat., Dec. 9.


Khizr Khan The Gold Star father who created one of the 2016 presidential campaign’s iconic images when he brandished a Constitution at the Democratic National Convention and challenged what’s-his-name to read it (wonder if he has yet?) presents his book An American Family. Hosted by the Seattle University School of Theology. Campion Hall, Seattle University, 901 12th Ave. Free. 7 p.m. Fri., Dec. 8.


8 Women This délicieux 2002 musical murder mystery, set in a snowbound chateau, gathers a multigenerational dream team of French actresses. Qui l’a fait? SIFF’s “French Truly Salon” event is preceded by French wine and treats at 6:30 and a talk on French Christmas traditions at 6:45. SIFF Film Center, Northwest Rooms, Seattle Center, siff.net. $20–$25. 7:45 p.m. Wed., Dec. 6.


Jose Gonzales Trio It’s not often acknowledged, but Vince Guaraldi’s “Linus and Lucy” theme, composed for A Charlie Brown Christmas, has to be one of the most instantly recognizable pieces of music ever written; nobody doesn’t know that opening left-hand riff. For this double holiday event, Gonzales and his trio will play the evergreen animated special’s peerlessly evocative score in its entirety. Cornish Playhouse, Seattle Center, strawshop.org. 1 p.m. (for families, $15–$24) & 6 p.m. (for adults, with cocktails, $27–$75), Sun., Dec. 10.

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