Memento

In Chris Nolan's smart, surprising 2000 indie breakthrough, a man bent on avenging his wife’s murder is hindered by short-term memory loss incurred during the assault. His pockets full of Polaroids and Post-it notes, his skin covered with mnemonic tattoos, Leonard (Guy Pearce) becomes the unwitting agent of predetermined retribution. Ingeniously, Mememto employs a backwards narrative structure: each scene begins with a missing context supplied by the one that follows (for us)—the one that precedes it (for Leonard). Storytelling is as much the film's subject as vengeance. Moreover, Leonard’s unreliable narration, though often funny and affecting, leads the spectator astray. Among those involved in Leonard’s unpredictable investigation are Carrie-Anne Moss’ Natalie (whom he believes) and Joe Pantoliano’ Teddy (whom he doubts). Movie screens at midnight. (R) BRIAN MILLER

Fri., Nov. 5; Sat., Nov. 6, 2010

 
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