The Slants

Thursday, December 20

From “Turning Japanese” and “Big in Japan” to “China Girl,” there’s no denying that the ‘80s were officially the best decade for musicians to obsess over the people and countries of Asia and get a hit song out of it. (Even Chaka Khan had a song called “Chinatown”). So when The Slants, a Portland-based, all-Asian synth-rock band got together in 2006, they had no trouble finding their niche. On their latest disc, Slanted Eyes, Slanted Hearts, the faintly Faint-ish band capitalize on their all-Asian line-up, “sing for the Japanese/And the Chinese/And all the dirty knees,” reference Japanese surreal fiction writer Haruki Murakami and Hong Kong filmmaker Kar Wai Wong, and have became the band to book at anime conventions. So what if you’re not Asian? No worries—their propulsive, danceable drive, and synthy new wave melodies will have you catching yellow fever in no time. With Halophile and Channel.

Listen to a sample of The Slants' "Love Within My Sin."

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Thu., Dec. 20, 9 p.m., 2007

 
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