Checking in with Chad of the Showbox

Chad Queirolo

Booking manager at the Showbox; co-owner of Showbox(2), concert/event planning arm, which does corporate/private events and larger concerts.

How did you get your start in the music (under)world?

I am a music fan. I saw my first concert in 1979 (Kiss on the Dynasty Tour), and the awesome feeling of seeing a great live band was well ingrained that night. Took another 15 years or so for me to start putting on little shows in Olympia and touring with bands, but from there, it has gone pretty well in that I get to do concerts from the Showbox to the Paramount to the KeyArena and corporate events around the country.

What paid the bills before?

I was a sailor, a dishwasher, a waiter, a social worker, a roadie, a tour manager.

Favorite part of your job:

I actually have a lot of fun going to work. While most people seem to not love work, I got lucky, and I think work is great. And sitting in my office watching our ticketing guy having to tell dudes that the Showbox isn't a strip club and sending them either up or down the street to where the goods really are.

Most memorable Showbox shows you've booked and why:

1. Slayer—I am a huge fan, and there was just no way that I ever thought, like in 1987 listening to them at volume 11, that I would ever become a concert promoter, and that I would EVER get to do a Slayer show, especially in a room like the Showbox. It was ridiculous and awesome. I spent the whole show sitting in the barricade three feet away from them freaking out.

2. Pearl Jam—once again, it is just epic to see a globally huge band in your little venue. The 2002 shows were especially [epic]. For I think the first time that tour, Ed put that Bush mask on to sing "Bushleaguer." It was a stunningly great moment for me, and for most everyone . . . except the Republicans maybe. A great DVD came out of that two-night run also.

3. Elliott Smith—The saddest show I ever saw. Elliott was a mess, couldn't recall any of his songs, played slumped on a chair completely drugged out, and it killed me to watch him come to an end. I adored Elliott, and it was the worst show I have ever had to watch.

4. Robin Williams—Three-night run that was awesome, mostly just in that Robin Williams wanted to play the Showbox because he had heard it was a cool spot. I didn't think he was all that funny, but it was still rad to have him play, and he was a good guy.

5. Murder City Devils and Botch final shows—These were bands I had represented as a tour agent, and if I had to see them call it quits, I guess there would be no better place than on the stage I book. Just epic shows, both. Hopefully, Botch will reunite, if only for a night at the Showbox, as the Devils did this summer.

6. Bo Diddley and Mudhoney— Putting these two together was as fun as any show I have ever thought of. It's also the first time Bo Diddley had done numbers [i.e., sold lots of tickets] in a long time.

7. Snoop Dogg—Come on! Snoop Dogg at the Showbox? Whoa.

Most ridiculous rider:

Rap acts asking for cases of Trojan Magnums.

Your top records to listen to while:

Driving: Band of Horses Everything all the Time was stuck in my CD player for five months this year.

Cleaning the house: New Pornographers Electric Version or Thermals More Parts per Million make me go like mad.

Fighting: Slayer Reign in Blood—the most perfect speed-metal record ever.

Weed smokin': Melvins Lysol—you can't fast-forward the CD, which is how it should be.

Best record to impress everyone by knowing all the lyrics: NWA Straight Outta Compton

apecknold@seattleweekly.com

 
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