Food News

September 20 - 27, 2006 (expanded from print version).

NEWS To celebrate Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, which begins on Friday, Sept. 22, local bakeries offer challah, a traditional braided egg bread, often created in a circular form to represent the cycle of the year. A few local bakeries make challah specifically for High Holy Days, including Leah's Bakery, a kosher bakery at 2205 N.E. 65th St. (Ravenna) and Macrina at 2408 First Ave. (Belltown). North Hill Bakery (on Capitol Hill at 518 15th Ave. E.) makes versions with and without golden raisins, adding a bit of traditional sweetness to the season, and, as lore has it, to your year. You might want to observe this tradition, indulging in a bit of sweet eggy goodness. If you can't make it to the bakeries Friday, check back, because both Macrina and North Hill bake challah every Friday. If you need another reason to indulge in your favorite caffeinated drink, search no more. According to a study published in the journal Neuroscience, the caffeine equivalent of five cups of coffee a day protected mice with Alzheimer's disease against almost certain memory loss. A human with a taste for espresso might achieve the 500 mg dose of caffeine with fewer than five cups. Gordon Brothers Winery's 2002 Syrah (from Pasco, Wash.) won two awards from Decanter magazine, both the North American and International Awards for "Rhone Varietal over £10." This award-winner sells for $20. FARM FRESH Fresh, local crops at this week's farmers markets include a bevy of fruit, including Interlocken grapes, Moonglow pears, and Honey Crisp apples. If you're worried that prices at the farmers markets might be higher than at your grocery store, this isn't necessarily true; the Food Filer scored some great cheap eats at the Ballard Farmers Market: $2 for a generous bag of arugula, two summer squash for less than a buck, and a lip-smackingly succulent white-fleshed nectarine for $1.50. Visit the Ballard Market on Sundays, 10 a.m.–4 p.m., Ballard Avenue at 20th Avenue Northwest. To find a market in your neighborhood, visit http://dnr.metrokc.gov/wlr/farms/farmers_markets.htm. Food and/or beverage news? E-mail food@seattleweekly.com. Advance registration or reservations are recommended for most of the following events. Prices exclusive of tax and gratuity unless otherwise noted. DRINK UP September 22–24 The Ninth Annual Fremont Oktoberfest offers a beer garden with over 30 Northwest beers, classical carnival rides, "Fremontopia" for the kids, live music, crafters, and a three-mile walk/run, with a special "Beer Belly" Division: "runners must have adequate girth to qualify." $15 advance/$20 at the door (includes a mug and five tastes). Friday, begins at 5 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.-midnight, Sun. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Solstice Plaza, North 34th Street and Fremont Avenue. 206-633-0422, www.fremontoktoberfest.com FREMONT BACK TO SCHOOL Saturday, September 23 The Indian Spice Trader offers a primer in how to blend exotic Indian spices. Employing cumin, ginger, and masala, the menu includes greens with tropical fruit nectar vinaigrette, yam curry with honey, and Madrasi masala-rubbed chicken. $35/$30 members. 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Issaquah PCC, 1810 12th Ave. N.W., 425-369-1222. ISSAQUAH ON THE PLATE Thursday, September 21 If you're a diehard fan of the Discovery Channel's The Deadliest Catch, you might want to drop some big bucks to meet the famous King crab fishermen, brothers Sig, Edgar, and Norman Hansen, who hail from Shoreline, as they regale you with tales of their adventures on the sea. The meal features, of course, Alaskan King crab. $85. 6:30 p.m., Elliott's Oyster House, 1201 Alaskan Way, Pier 56, 206-623-4340. WATERFRONT

 
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