Symphony Roll Call

Comings and goings—and stayings—at the Seattle Symphony: Joshua Roman, 22, fresh out of the Cleveland Institute of Music, takes over as first-chair

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Tony Likes Seattle

Intiman Theatre bags major award; other artists nominated. Plus: Symphony and books news.

Symphony Roll Call

Comings and goings—and stayings—at the Seattle Symphony: Joshua Roman, 22, fresh out of the Cleveland Institute of Music, takes over as first-chair cello from Raymond Davis, who is retiring after 44 seasons with the orchestra. Carolyn Kuan has been named assistant conductor, a two-year post. The 2006–07 season will be George Fiore's seventh and final one as associate conductor of choral activities; a nationwide search for his successor will be launched soon. No word yet regarding the concertmaster position, which has been vacant now for nearly two years. And Gerard Schwarz's contract as music director has been extended through the 2010–11 season, which will be his 26th with the orchestra. See related article. GAVIN BORCHERT

Intiman's Name in Lights

The Tony Award for best regional theater goes to Intiman this year—a major honor for a company that has done much to distinguish itself locally and nationally over the past several seasons. It helped, no doubt, that artistic director Bartlett Sher has kept his name in front of New York critics as director of The Light in the Piazza, which won six Tonys in 2005, and an acclaimed revival of Clifford Odets' Awake and Sing, currently nominated for eight awards. This year's noms were announced at the same time as the winner of the regional Tony, on Tuesday, May 16. Also singled out was the 5th Avenue Theatre–spawned production of The Wedding Singer, short-listed for five awards, and Seattle-based dance talent Donald Byrd, nominated for best choreography for The Color Purple. LYNN JACOBSON

Book Break

What's next: modern dance around the water cooler? The New York Times reports that a growing number of corporations—including Starbucks and Microsoft—are hosting author readings at work for overscheduled workers who might not have the time or inclination to visit a bookstore. Featured prominently in the article is Seattle literary entrepreneur Kim Ricketts,who organizes corporate readings in addition to the popular local Cooks & Books Visiting Chef Series. Not all local booksellers are enamored of the idea, of course, seeing as how it may cut into bookstore traffic and sales. Here at Seattle Weekly, we're all for bookselling and reading in any form, but we wonder: Do we really need one less reason to leave the office? For the curious: www.kimricketts.com. LYNN JACOBSON

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