Conor Byrne Pub

5140 Ballard Ave. N.W., 206-784-3640

DJ Tamara

Though she rocks the Triple Door weekly, Tamara Weikel is more than just a DJ. Initially studying voice and composition at Cornish, she was inspired to explore multimedia while working on her vocal improv with local bands. Simultaneously, she managed residencies on Groovetech radio and helped spread love of drum and bass locally. A longtime fixture in Seattle's music scene, the DJ now does double duty singing free jazz with the Monktail Creative Music Concern ensembles. DJ/Turntablist. Between bands.

Suicide Jack

Their name screams melancholy, which seeps into their heart-wrenching ballads and soulful honky-tonk tunes. Like most blues brothers, the boys drown their sorrows in "Mr. Booze," one of their more well-known tracks, and croon to real-life stripper "Nadine," a remake of Chuck Berry's song of the same name. The band's members range from four to eight, bringing together a plethora of instruments to produce a moody and original sound. Blues. 6 p.m.

Na

One of this experimental trio's songs starts with the click of a camera's shutter, which intermittently punctuates the piece's piano/drums/moaning into sonic snapshots of good-natured absurdity. Japanese ex-pats Noriaki Watanabe, Shinsuke Yamada, and Kazu Nomura are regulars at improv house Gallery 1412, and have played SAM AfterHours—the perfect environment in which to get arty. Jazz/Experimental. 7 p.m.

Bill Horist

A practitioner of prepared guitar—wherein the instrument's fret board is stuck with various objects, changing the timbre, tone, and general character of the strings and the pickups, and the manner in which they are asked to resonate—Horist plays improvisationally, both alone and with others (Wally Shoup, Wayne Horvitz, Chris Corsano). As interested in those various objects (rarely the same from one show to the next) as the guitar itself, it's likely the combination that compels the musician the most. Producing soaring, scorching movements and lithe landscapes, Horist's music is more than the sum of its parts. Guitarist. 8 p.m.

Picoso

Formed in 2004, this lively Latin ensemble has earned raves from the sophisticated world music fans that frequent Fremont's watering holes to KEXP tastemakers like Wo' Pop's Darek Mazzone. "The vibe is urban and very street, without losing the relationship to the ancestor sound," says Mazzone in reference to their meld of Cuban son, salsa, cha-cha, and beyond. In Picoso's case, it takes a village—founder/vocalist/tresero Eli Rosenblatt and seven musicians on a variety of strings, horns, and percussion—to raise the roof. World/Reggae. 9 p.m.

Ficus Trio

Featuring saxophone (Gregory Reynolds), piano (Gust Burns), and percussion (Greg Campbell), the Ficus Trio is often able to play quiet, coaxed textures that stop a person and ask gently to be heard and understood. Then again, the group's also capable of twisting knots of noise into pounding, carousing abstractions. While most often billed as a free-jazz outfit, you might hear a rock beat protruding, a melancholic melody bleeding, or a cabaret-esque romp emanating from the Ficus Trio's explorations. Jazz/Experimental. 10 p.m.

Swampdweller

"Highly recommended" by Seattle Weekly last summer, Swampdweller have continued to impress with their blend of jazz, funk, hip-hop, and even Indian sounds. Featuring a number of well-known local players (including Bebop and Destruction saxman Marc Fendel and Drunken Masters organist Joe Doria), they've also captured their groove on 2005's self-titled debut album. Jazz/ Experimental. 11 p.m.

Wayne Horvitz and Sweeter Than the Day

The masterful keyboardist-composer's experimental side has made him an internationally admired figure, while the groovy Zony Mash gave him perhaps his most sustained regional success. Recent recordings have focused on his string-quartet writing (a Tzadik disc, Whispers, Hymns and a Murmur, and the forthcoming Way Out East), while he continues to tour and play with Sweeter Than the Day as well as the covers project Varmint. Jazz/ Experimental. Midnight.

 
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