WED - CLASSICAL

In his centennial year, Dmitri Shostakovich's tormented relationship with the Soviet regime epitomizes the clash of art and politics. The Seattle Symphony's

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This Week's Critics' Picks

Seattle Symphony's Shostakovich Festival, cartoonist Tom Tomorrow, and the Arab & Iranian Film Festival.

WED - CLASSICAL

In his centennial year, Dmitri Shostakovich's tormented relationship with the Soviet regime epitomizes the clash of art and politics. The Seattle Symphony's "Shostakovich Uncovered" festival explores his legacy. Benaroya Hall, Third Avenue and Union Street, 206-215-4747, www.seattlesymphony.org. $15–$87. Various times and days, March 29– April 15. GAVIN BORCHERT

FRI - BOOKS

Ripped from the pages—our pages—cartoonist Tom Tomorrow collects his Bush-bashing panels in the book Hell in a Handbasket. Frequent target Ann Coulter even supplies a jacket blurb: "Nothing remotely funny." Tomorrow appears at Elliott Bay Book Co., 101 S. Main St., 206-624-6600, www.elliottbaybook.com. Free. 6 p.m. Fri., March 31. BRIAN MILLER

FRI-thurs - film

Local director James Longley's timely doc Iraq in Fragments (pictured) opens the Seattle Arab & Iranian Film Festival, one of a dozen-odd features from the world's most important (and misunderstood) region. Cinerama (Fri.) and Broadway Performance Hall, 1625 Broadway Ave., 206-325-6000, www.saiff.com. $7–$9. Fri., March 31–Thurs., April 6. BRIAN MILLER

 
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