The Physiology of Love

Send listings two weeks in advance to braincity@seattleweekly.com.

Lorri Davis The wife of death-row prisoner Damien Echols, believed by many (including sponsor Innocence Project Northwest) to have been falsely accused of murder, speaks about his case and other alleged judicial failures. UW School of Law, William Gates Hall (Room 138), Northeast 43rd Street and 15th Avenue Northeast, 206-979-2202. Free. 6:45 p.m. Wed., Feb. 8.

David Domke Expect the University of Washington journalism professor to be both fair and balanced in his take on "The New Echo Chamber: The State of the American New Media and Why It Matters." Epiphany Church, 1805 38th Ave., 206-324-2573, www.epiphanyseattle.org. Free. 7-9 p.m. Wed., Feb. 8.

James Yee The former U.S. Army chaplain was arrested on espionage charges after befriending POWs at Guantánamo Bay, an experience he recounts in his new book, For God and Country. He'll talk about human rights, terrorism, and religious profiling (Yee is Muslim). UW Kane Hall (Room 120), 206-543-6450, www.grad.washington.edu/gomap. Free. 7 p.m. Wed., Feb. 8.

Lester Brown The Mountaineers and the World Affairs Council host the Earth Policy Institute president, who'll discuss globalization's impact on the environment. 300 Third Ave. W., 206-441-5910, www.world-affairs.org. $15 ($10 WAC members). 7 p.m. Thurs., Feb. 9.

The Neurobiology of Love Are those really butterflies in your stomach? Professional counselor Steve Morris explains the physiological components of l'amour in a talk sponsored by Jewish Family Service. JFS, 1601 16th Ave., 206-461-3240 ext. 3146, www.jfsseattle.org. $12.50 ($10 advance). 7-8:30 p.m. Thurs., Feb. 9.

Anya Kamenetz The author of Generation Debt, a detailed exploration of Gen Y's financial woes, talks about student-loan debt, sinking wages and rising tuition rates, and other economic bugaboos. Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., 206-652-4255, www.townhallseattle.org. $5. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Feb. 9.

Susan F. Wood The former FDA official discusses the latest scientific findings concerning Plan B, aka emergency contraception, and why it isn't yet available over the counter. UW Health Sciences Building (Hogness Auditorium, Room A-420), 206-543-6452. Free. 2 p.m. Fri., Feb. 10.

Mona Lisa Saloy At a reception and a book talk, the poet, University of Washington visiting professor, and displaced New Orleans resident talks about and reads from her most recent collection, Red Beans and Ricely Yours, which includes the lines: "New Orleans leaves a honey taste in my mouth/The cracked boulevards and weeping willows/shade bare front porches/and call her children home." UW Kane Hall (Room 120), 206-543-9016, www.grad.washington.edu/gomap. Free. Reception: 5 p.m. (RSVP required). Book talk: 7 p.m. Fri., Feb. 10.

ACLU Annual Meeting Subjects to be examined include "Privacy in the Age of Terror" and "Detentions, Torture, and the Law." Among the presenters: ex-Seattle Chief of Police Norm Stamper (on drug policy) and author/"security technologist" Bruce Schneier. UW Kane Hall, 206-624-2184, www.aclu-wa.org. Free ($10 donations "welcomed"). 12:30 p.m. (closing reception: 5 p.m.). Sat., Feb. 11.

Ray Ybarra One of the ACLU's six Racial Justice Fellows, he'll describe his work keeping tabs on the Minutemen, an anti-immigrant group active at the U.S.–Mexican border. UW School of Law, William Gates Hall (Room 138), Northeast 43rd Street and 15th Avenue Northeast,, 206-624-2184, www.aclu-wa.org. Free. 5:30 p.m. Mon., Feb. 13.

Frank McKenna Canada's ambassador to the U.S. talks about the two countries' economic and cultural relationship during peacetime, wartime, and disasters like Katrina. Sponsored by the Trade Development Alliance. Fairmont Olympic Hotel (Spanish Ballroom), 411 University St., 206-389-7227. $25 (includes breakfast; $10 students). 7:30-9 a.m. Tues., Feb. 14.

Richard West The director of the National Museum of the American Indian discusses the challenges and possibilities of Native American culture in the 21st century. UW Kane Hall (Walker-Ames Room), 206-543-9779, www.grad.washington.edu/gomap. Free. Reception: 5 p.m. (RSVP requested). Lecture: 7 p.m. Wed., Feb. 15.

Film Screening The 2005 documentary Being Caribou chronicles the adventures of two married wildlife biologists living among the antlered, shaggy creatures in ANWR. Ballard Re-Store, 1440 N.W. 52nd St., 206-762-1976, www.nweec.org. Free (donations appreciated). 7 p.m. Wed., Feb. 15.

Marriage Equality Forum In anticipation of the Washington Supreme Court's ruling on a challenge to the same-sex marriage ban, the League of Women Voters hosts a panel featuring local attorneys Lisa Stone and Steve O'Ban, Families Northwest head Jeff Kemp, and Judy Fleissner and Chris Gamache, the couple whose case (taken up by the ACLU) brought the issue to the high court. First United Methodist Church, 1934 108th Ave. N.E. (Bellevue), 206-329-4848, seattle.wa.lwv.org. Free. 7-8:30 p.m. Wed., Feb. 15.

Frederick vom Saal "Plastics" was The Graduate's watchword, but are they harmful to our health? The University of Missouri biology professor discusses the current research. Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., 206-652-4255, www.townhallseattle.org. $15 ($14 advance). 7 p.m. Wed., Feb. 15.

Citizen Education Forum A panel of University of Washington faculty members examines issues related to civic involvement, including the role of the citizen in a democratic society. Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., 206-543-0540, www.uwalum.com. Free. 6:30 p.m. Thurs., Feb. 16.

 
comments powered by Disqus