Arts Picks

TUESDAY

FILM

BALANCHINE ON FILM

A performance is only the tip of the iceberg. The 1997 documentary Balanchine Lives! shows us the rehearsal footage as well, as stagers and directors, including Pacific Northwest Ballet's Francia Russell, recall their long hours in the studio, keeping Balanchine's works alive around the world. (Above, Russell is shown in 1957 as a member of the New York Ballet, with Balanchine, Stravinsky, and Lucia Davidova looking on.) Also screened tonight: a 1965 public-TV portrait of the choreographer. It's the second night in a three-part program on Balanchine, sponsored by PNB. 7:30 p.m. Tues., May 4. $12. McCaw Hall, Seattle Center, 206-441-2424. SANDRA KURTZ

WEDNESDAY

STAGE

THE BEAUTY OF THE FATHER

OK, there are other reasons to see this dreamy, sensual story of a young woman's reunion with her estranged artist father besides the press photos of Paul Nicholas (above)—who apparently plays the hot Moroccan "object of everyone's affection." Reasons include: Seattle's first chance to experience the acclaimed lyricism of playwright Nilo Cruz, who won the Pulitzer in 2003 for his Anna in the Tropics (it will open the Rep's next season); and the five members of the cast (including Onahoua Rodriguez, shown with Nicholas), who are all making their Seattle Rep debuts. Opens Wed., April 28. 7:30 p.m. Tues.–Sun.; 2 p.m. matinees Sat.–Sun. Ends Sat., May 15. $10–$29. Seattle Repertory Theatre, Seattle Center, 206-443-2222. STEVE WIECKING

FRIDAY

STAGE

UBU

If Sarah Rudinoff isn't playing the pants off the power-hungry Pa Ubu in this adaptation of Alfred Jarry's classic 19th-century political burlesque, it'll be a first. From her surly, glowering Yitzhak in Re-bar's Hedwig and the Angry Inch right up through her butch blowhard-on-the-make in Annex's Stage Door, Rudinoff has long since proved herself a show-stopping expert at making the most of man drag. Previews begin 8 p.m. Fri., April 30. $10–$40. Runs Wed., May 5–Sun., June 6. Empty Space Theatre, 3509 Fremont Ave. N., 206-547-7500. STEVE WIECKING

TUESDAY

READINGS

DAWN PRINCE-HUGHES

Autism is the new ADD, making the cover of both TIME and Newsweek. But our cultural obsession has revolved mainly around boys, who are most afflicted, and the rash of books has taken a largely scientific approach. In her new memoir, Songs of the Gorilla Nation (Harmony Books, $24), Prince-Hughes, an anthropology instructor at Western Washington University, offers a more personal perspective, telling the moving story of how visits to the gorillas at Woodland Park Zoo helped her emerge from emotional isolation. 7 p.m. Tues., May 4. Third Place Books, 17171 Bothell Way N.E., 206-366-3333. MARK D. FEFER

TUESDAY

READINGS

AMY STEWART

Beneath our homes, offices, and cities is an army of earthworms quietly regurgitating and improving the soil, keeping our dirt alive and well. In The Earth Moved: On the Remarkable Achievements of Earthworms (Algonquin Books, $23.95), Stewart tells the captivating and sometimes really gross tale of the worm—its sex life; its ability to grow back its entire body from one segment; and its surprisingly intelligent problem-solving skills. Because Stewart is an avid gardener and not an oligochaetologist, she weaves an engrossing tale, warm in tone and free of scientific trivia. Plus, she's appearing just in time for International Compost Awareness Week! 7 p.m. Tues., May 4. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 206-634-3400. SAMANTHA STOREY

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