Arts Picks

SATURDAY

JAZZ

RASHIED ALI QUINTET

Here's the intergenerational wild-card jazz concert of the season. Ali is the famed drumming maelstrom who helped push Coltrane's late blowing into space; more recently he's played inscrutable music with James "Blood" Ulmer and recorded weirdly straight-ahead stuff as a leader. Joining him is Coltrane's son, Ravi on tenor sax—an uneven, mostly hardbop player—and bassist Reggie Workman, who's been an all-over creative force since participating in Trane's band for a spell in the early '60s. Then add in two hometown boys: trumpeter Jumaane Smith (Roosevelt High, class of '99), who has been gigging with Ali in New York while studying at Julliard with conservative classicist Wynton Marsalis; and guitarist Andy Coe (Roosevelt '97), who's back in Seattle, playing postcollege rock and West African music. Tonight is the band's third performance together, and needless to say, the results could go in any direction. 7:30 and 10 p.m. Sat., April 24. $20. The Triple Door, 216 Union St., 206-838-4333. MARK D. FEFER

WEDNESDAY - THURSDAY

JAZZ

STEVE COLEMAN AND FIVE ELEMENTS

Coleman has proved himself a master not just of syncretic Afro sounds but of brand management: In the '80s, his Brooklyn-centered M-Base project became synonymous with a sharp-edged, complex funk that anticipated "acid jazz" and was always more interesting. His sour tone on alto, and intricate solos, like a deep mathematician plowing through formulas, are unmistakable. And even now, with so many other artists grinding that same multigenre ax, his band still excites. Pianist Craig Taborn should be a highlight. 7:30 p.m. Wed., April 21–Thurs., April 22. $30. The Triple Door, 216 Union St., 206-838-4333. MARK D. FEFER

THURSDAY - SUNDAY

JAZZ

BILL FRISELL B-3 TRIO

Surely the organ trio's more omnipresent today that it was during the 1960s heyday that everyone's so busy reviving. And if it were anyone else arriving this late to the B-3 nostalgia party, we'd say, "Give it a rest." But since it's Bill Frisell, the guitar genius who always makes something brilliant happen, and since he's got two great players with him—Sam Yahel on keys and the chameleony drummer Brian Blade, both of them borrowed from Josh Redman's own excellent B-3 trio—we gotta say "must see" instead. 8 and 10:15 p.m. Thurs., April 22–Sat., April 24; 6:30 and 8:45 p.m. Sun., April 25. $20.50–$22.50. Dimitriou's Jazz Alley, 2033 Sixth Ave., 206-441-9729. MARK D. FEFER

MONDAY

JAZZ

THE DEARDORF/PETERSON GROUP

If there's a distinct sound to Seattle jazz, and I think there is, these two longtime Cornish instructors have helped define it. Celebrating their new disc, Portal, on Ballard's Origin label, they and some veteran pals deliver a quintessential mainstream Seattle session: relaxed, light on its feet, gregarious. On bass, Deardorf has a gorgeous deep resonance, his ideas always flowing and well considered; Peterson's no-fuss hollow-body guitar manages to swing without being too boppy. Pianist George Cables (once Dexter's main man) is on Portal and on board for this show as well. 8 p.m. Mon., April 26. $15. Dimitriou's Jazz Alley, 2033 Sixth Ave., 206-441-9729. MARK D. FEFER

TUESDAY

JAZZ

THE LATIN GIANTS OF JAZZ

Their former leader is playing "Oye Como Va" somewhere in the Great Beyond now, but these orquesta members are keeping Tito Puente's sound alive—as well as the music of his legendary contemporaries Machito (below) and Tito Rodriguez, who together dominated the Latin dance mania of post–World War II New York. Puente succeeded best at riding the cultural evolution in the decades following (even turning up on The Simpsons). If you love this music's dynamic syncopated power, it never gets old. 8 p.m. Tues., April 27. $19.50–$23.50. Dimitriou's Jazz Alley, 2033 Sixth Ave., 206-441-9729. MARK D. FEFER

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