MUSIC, PERFORMANCE, VISUAL ARTS, BOOKS, & FILM

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THURS-SUN

DANCE

BOWIE: INSIDE/OUTSIDE

Ever since the Joffrey created the first "full-evening rock ballet" set to the music of Prince 10 years ago, piggybacking on

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MUSIC, PERFORMANCE, VISUAL ARTS, BOOKS, & FILM

  • MUSIC, PERFORMANCE, VISUAL ARTS, BOOKS, & FILM

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    THURS-SUN

    DANCE

    BOWIE: INSIDE/OUTSIDE

    Ever since the Joffrey created the first "full-evening rock ballet" set to the music of Prince 10 years ago, piggybacking on the camp and notoriety of pop music has been a sure way to fill the theaters. "Buttrock Suites" from Crispin Spaeth and d9, set to Styx, Foreigner, Journey, and the like, was a huge success in March. Now, on the 20th anniversary of Bowie's Let's Dance!, OtB has asked nine top Seattle choreographers to use the star-dusted one for inspiration, each of them selecting some era, attitude, and mix of songs. (Wade Madsen, above, goes for the glam '70s phase.) Zeke Keeble and his band, Marrow, will play Bowie covers and add other audio and video elements. 8 p.m. Thurs., May 8-Sun., May 11. $12-$25. On the Boards, 100 W. Roy St., 206-217-9888. MARK D. FEFER

    SAT

    OUTDOORS

    TUGBOAT RACES

    With all the attention lavished on the marketing-heavy, lifestyle-oriented businesses that define SeattleStarbucks, Nordstrom, Amazon, yada yadait's easy to overlook the fact that this town still has a working waterfront where people are doing real jobs. Come watch a few of them have some fun in the annual tugboat race championships40 boats competing in the largest such event in the world. Events get under way at 12:30 p.m. with the Fire Department shooting off their spouts, followed by a (noncompetitive) tugboat parade, a Coast Guard air-sea helicopter rescue, a demonstration of "enhanced oil skimming," and, starting at 2 p.m., tug races in small, harbor, and unlimited classes. Wagering discouraged. Part of the Seattle Maritime Festival. 12:30 p.m. Sat., May 10. Pier 86 (the Grain Terminal in Myrtle Edwards Park) to Pier 62/63 (home of Summer Nights at the Pier). MARK D. FEFER

    SAT & MON

    READINGS

    ERIC SCHLOSSER

    His best-selling Fast Food Nation made you feel both personally fat and generally disgusted by what, and how, this country eats. But the size of the American obesity epidemic is nothing compared to our taste for porn and illegal drugs, which, together with migrant labor, forms an unwieldy untaxed underground economy worth about $1 trillion, according to Schlosser's latest, Reefer Madness. His suggestions: Pot should be legalized, and immigration reformed. What about porn? The marketplace has already spoken overwhelmingly in favor. "I like the idea of fewer laws, strictly enforced," says the libertarian author, who again inveighs against the collusion of small government and big business against the underground entrepreneur. 2 p.m. Sat., May 10, Third Place Books, 17171 Bothell Way N.E., 206- 366-3333. 7:30 p.m. Mon., May 12, Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave, 206-652-4255. BRIAN MILLER

    MON-SAT

    ARTS

    INTERNATIONAL CHILDREN'S FESTIVAL

    Most of us were in a hurry to grow up, but there are some benefits to being a kid and this festival is one of the best. Now in its 17th year, the program includes La Troupe de Mademoiselle Clairette (seen below)a professional dance company direct from Parisin an authentic cancan; West African festival dancing by Etienne Cakpo and Gansango; "Bollywood Masala!," an Indian dance party to indie-pop and Bollywold film music, and a Pacific Rim music sampler. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Mon., May 12-Sat., May 17. $7-$12. Seattle Center, 206-684-7338. SANDRA KURTZ

    FRI-THURS

    FILM

    TWO BY BUѕEL

    Luis Bu�'s 1972 Oscar-winning absurdist comedy The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie was filmed in French, but the dream logic translates into all languages. Fernando Rey (pictured with Delphine Seyrig) plays the laughably corrupt ambassador from a Latin American dictatorship. He and his upper-crusty Paris friends just want to enjoy a nice dinner party, but Bu�'s constant interruptions, digressions, and non sequiturs drive them batty, and the encroaching anarchy only makes them appear ridiculous and obsolete. 1974's rarely screened The Phantom of Liberty is less a political argument than a stream of pure surrealist vignettes: people shitting in public and dining in private; a sniper congratulated by the court; and a doctor telling his patient, "You've got cancer. Cigarette?"

    Fri., May 9-Thurs., May 15. $7. Grand Illusion, 1403 N.E. 50th St., 206-523-3935. BRIAN MILLER

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